A Christmas Carol Scrooge Character Analysis

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A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens shows Scrooge learning the spirit of Christmas, changing himself, and becoming a more compassionate person. In the story, Scrooge meets three ghosts, past, present, and future. The first ghost shows him that he used to be a happier person. The second ghost shows him that his behavior causes trouble for other people. The third and final ghost shows him what could happen if he refuses to change his ways. After meeting each of these ghosts, the reader begins to see Scrooge change for the better. In the beginning of the story, Scrooge is a miserable man who seems to hate pretty much everybody. He does not allow his clerk to have a fire and does not participate in Christmas. When Marley’s ghost visits him, …show more content…
His sensitivity for mankind stirred, he welcomes the Ghost of Christmas Present to show him another “lesson.” He is directed to the festive joy in the suburban dwelling of his clerk, Bob Cratchitt, overshadowed by Tiny Tim’s declining health, and with frightfulness he sees the pitiful youngsters, Ignorance and Want, the outgrowths of human detachment, attached to the ghost. (Wagner, 1) It also shows him that people are able to enjoy life without having a lot of money like Scrooge. As the spirits of Christmas Past and of Christmas Present show up, Scrooge’s recovery starts. He recollects little deeds of thoughtfulness that he may have done. As he recalls these, we get to be mindful of the complete bliss, which will his once he has turned out to be altogether charitable. Actually, one may say that in no other story does Dickens make it more evident that he compares an ethically morally awakened soul with complete joy. (Love, 2) He shows Scrooge a number of scenes with several points. When showing the family in the coal miner’s hut, the men working at the lighthouse, and the crew of the ship, he shows Scrooge that celebrating Christmas is not something that needs to be earned. When Scrooge is shown the Cratchitt’s family dinner, the spirit gives a face to the poor whom Scrooge made fun of in Stave 1. “…If they would rather die … they had better do it, and decrease the …show more content…
This spirits intentions were limited to cementing the changes that Scrooge had made. By the time he met this ghost, he had already decided that he was going to change. This is why he was confused throughout the chapter. It shows him that his current behavior and mood make it impossible to love him or even care about him. The Spirit served to show him to hopelessness of continuing on his present course. The ghost of Christmas Yet to Come continues to demonstrate to him his own demise, his body “plundered and bereft, unwatched, unwept, uncared for.” (Wagner, 1) The “death” of Tiny Tim struck some sort of chord in him and the fear of the grave gave him urgency with which to apply the principles of his newly found life. The Ghost of Christmas Future helped give him the urgency that he required for this transformation. As Scrooge awakes on Christmas Day, he cheers in another “glorious” day. Feeling renewed, he goes forward to send a prize turkey to the Cratchitt’s, donates money, and gets to be as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew. (Wagner, 1) In conclusion, the Ghost of Christmas Past helped him realize his regrets, the Ghost of Christmas Present helped show him the hope of change, and the Ghost of Christmas Future helped show him the urgency needed for his transformation. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens shows Scrooge

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