Analysis Of School By Kyoko Mori

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The author and speaker of School is a Japanese woman who moved from Japan to earn her college education in America, named Kyoko Mori. Ever since she graduated, she has published three books and many different essays to establish her reputation as a well renowned author in the world of literature. In 1999, Mori decided to write a novel to describe the experiences she and others close to her had in America and Japan by comparing the two. In this excerpted chapter of Mori 's book, she significantly explains the differences between the American and Japanese education systems to bring a sense of realization to the middle class, educated writers and teachers that have interests in education and culture, that school and "the real world" are the same. …show more content…
Her classmates “could hardly wait to graduate” and get out of school for good. They believed that school and “the real world” were not the same. Her classmates were convinced that school was no part of this so-called “real world”. According to Mori, what they didn’t consider was that school was “the real world”; it was just the beginning of theirs. Right after the claim is made by her classmates, she provides her own opinionated claim of how school and "the real world" are the same. By providing her own claim of school and "the real world", she establishes a basis for her argument. Mori describes the state of her classmates not being able to "concentrate on classes, knowing that they would be out of school forever" to address the teachers of her audience because the teachers are able to see a change in the attitudes and behaviors of their students. In this first paragraph, Mori describes her own experience of school and "the real world" as "more interesting" to her. Mori 's realization that school and "the real world" are the same is what strives her to convince her readers of school and "the real world" being the same. She utilizes her realization to continue her ideas to relating it to another point in her life after …show more content…
Mori explains the “problem” with the ie system in her opinion because she compares it to her opinion on the American system without explicitly doing so in this specific paragraph. In this paragraph, Mori describes the problem with the Japanese system being that “individual freedom…is sacrificed” for everyone who takes part in it. To her audience, being mostly American, individual freedom in the American education system is possible by voicing opinions, asking questions, and debating answers. The concept of individual freedom being sacrificed for education is foreign to them. Mori also refers back to her cousin who had struggled in the system to address the one positive aspect of the Japanese education system. Her cousin, who studied the art of flower arrangements, had one opportunity to prove that she has a well-developed skill of flower arrangements at a “public performance”. Mori shortly after explains that many of her American friends are not able to show any skills off with their skills in the art industry. With this public performance example, Mori is able to introduce to her audience that America also does have its flaws in its education system, it just needs to be improved with an adoption of Japanese education ideals to make people realize that school and “the real world” are definitely the same. Mori assumes now that her audience has more of an insight on Japanese

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