Analysis Of Fear Of The Female Voice By Sarah Gailey

Women have never had the same opportunities in society that men have. Women are often criticized with their every action. Criticisms like, women don’t have any authority, or women don’t have the same intellectual ability as men. These criticisms have created limitations on what women can achieve in society. In the article “Fear of the Female Voice,” Sarah Gailey intends to change the mindset of how women are constructed in society. Gailey uses an authoritative tone, along with issues that still affect women in society today in order to get her message across that women are equal to men. Gailey’s article can be related to a number of different texts and time periods because women have had the same issues in society for hundreds of years. Gailey …show more content…
A woman can have the same if not better opinions, or information as a man. Yet, because her voice doesn’t sound like a man’s we should completely ignore the woman. The idea that women have to make their voices sound like men is completely absurd. In Virginia Woolf’s piece, you learn that women had to live a whole different life as a writer during the 16th century.... “Had she survived, whatever she had written would have been twisted and deformed, issuing from a strained and morbid imagination.” Women did not have the ability to submit their writings as they were. Women were forced to write in a man’s pen name so that they could get any sort of recognition. If a women were to submit a piece of work she would get a response like “You write? What’s the good of your writing?” Women were heavily criticized for writing and men would not take the time of day to teach women how to read or write. As you can see both Gailey and Woolf bring up the idea that men force women to conform to the way they want. Men came up with the excuse that women aren’t as intellectually advanced as men in the 16th century and in the 21st …show more content…
The Handmaid’s tale is based on a totalitarian or authoritarian society. Women are in the society for mainly one reason, to get pregnant. If a woman cannot get pregnant, then the woman is sent out of the society because she is no longer useful. After reading the novel I thought that the novel was very far fetched and exaggerated. But, I got thinking and came up with the conclusion that the novel was as far fetched as I thought it was. In the mid 20th century women had two responsibilities. One, women were expected to bear children and take care of them. Two, women were expected to be housewives and not get a job. The life for women in the 1950s was not far off from the life of women in the Handmaid’s Tale. Women in the Handmaid’s Tale were in the society for one whole purpose, to get pregnant. To me, making the comparison between life of women in the mid 20th century and the life of women in the Handmaid’s Tale was quite terrifying. The fact that a fictional novel based on a totalitarian state could be related to real life in the 20th century was very shocking to me. I began to draw a conclusion that life during the 16th century (Room of One’s Own), 20th century, and the 21st century (Gailey’s article) are all based on the same principles. Those principles are that women are housewives, mothers, and can never be better than men. Men are still blind to those three principles that have been the backbone in

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