Analysis Of Robin Williams And Good Will Hunting

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Both the “Never Give In” speech by Winston Churchill and the “Good Will Hunting” monologue delivered by Robin Williams, are similar speeches in their themes and stylistic features. On October 29, 1941, United Kingdom Prime Minister Winston Churchill visited Harrow School to give an inspirational speech to the students. The world was an extremely dark place, World War II had just begun and the United Kingdom was struggling. The speech was optimistic, concerning the outcome of the war and referred to how quickly the country had changed over a short period of time. Good Will Hunting is a story of a young man 's struggle to find his place in the world. The troubled genius, is forced to endure therapy instead of jail. Robin Williams, the therapist, …show more content…
“Unless you wanna talk about you, who you are. And I’m fascinated. I’m in. But you don’t wanna do that, do you, sport? You’re terrified of what you might say. Your move, chief.” The speaker has employed rhetorical questions and shorter sentences, to empathises the importance of decision making and aspiring to make a change. Comparably, William Churchill aims to urge the students of Harrow school to contribute to the war and become part of the nation’s history. “we must…meet with Triumph and Disaster. And treat those two impostors just the same.” This personification of the words triumph and disaster helps the audience visualise the two impostor and have a sense of fear and courage. Equally, each speech aims to inspire their audience through conveying the idea of change and discussing their own personal …show more content…
“Do not let us speak of darker days: let us speak rather of sterner days. These are not dark days; these are great days - the greatest days our country has ever lived.” This contrast cannot fail to evoke emotion and hope for the audience. The repetition of the word days, aims to portray a country that stood together through a difficult time and persevered to conquer. Likewise, Williams speaks about the events in his life, which turned from happiness to unexpected tragedy. “You’ve never held your best friend’s head in your lap and watched him gasp his last breath, looking to you for help.” The speaker has employed emotive language, as well as a personal experience, to emphasis the struggles throughout his life. The technique also promotes a personal connection with the monologue, and enables the audience to put themselves in the position of the speaker. Similar to Churchill, Williams is intent on presenting the struggles, both big and small, throughout

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