Analysis Of Robert E Lee's An Old Fashioned Soldier In A Modern War

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Political leadership guided the North and South landscape, but the military leadership guided the battlefield. The Civil War was a modern war compared to the Napoleonic wars and for the South; Lee is seen by some scholars as a leader out of touch with modern warfare while other generals such as those from the Union were waging a modern style of warfare. In the article, An Old-Fashioned Soldier in a Modern War?: Robert E. Lee as Confederate General, Gary Gallagher takes a historiographical approach of how historians viewed Lee’s method of warfare to answer his question of whether or not Lee was outdated. These historians Gallagher references look at Lee’s aristocratic background, personality, and treatment of civilians as a gauge to determine …show more content…
Letters from British minister Sir Frederick William Adolphus Bruce to George William Frederick Villiers, fourth Earl of Clarendon and his government’s foreign secretary, provide a British observation of President Johnson’s policies during 1866. Following the war, the Anglo-American relations were strained and Bruce was to try to improve the relationship between the two nations. Foner provides additional background to Carroll’s reasons for a strained relationship in the form of the Fenian Brotherhood who was seeking recruits to invade Canada. President Johnson needed the support of the Irish-American voters in which many of them were members of Fenian …show more content…
Her article tears down Pollard’s Lost Cause idea of the Confederate soldier as she reviews Confederate suicides which humanizes the soldier and removes the soldier off of the noble soldier shelf. According to Miller Sommerville, suicide allowed the Confederate soldier control of his fate and the fear of not displaying cowardice on the battlefield. She further shows how the Culture of the Confederacy protected the soldier by viewing his suicide as a casualty of

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