Analysis Of Reforming Immigration For Good By Mae M. Ngai

1621 Words 7 Pages
In reading the article Reforming Immigration for Good written by Mae M. Ngai, I am interpreting this article in response to the editor if it should be published in The Shorthorn. Her position regarding immigration will most likely impact The Shorthorn readers because many UT Arlington students are immigrants or may have experienced a similar situation. Others might say who cares about immigration when in fact immigration laws have become a “top domestic priority” (Obama). Immigration has pointed towards disputes with major ethnic groups in the U.S. Ngai argues about our current immigration system which she claims is not practical, meaning she supports changing the immigration law. Readers may find this article interesting in many ways, because …show more content…
Ngai, the daughter of Chinese immigrants, grew up in a time when people were judged by their skin, race, and ethnicity. Ngai supports her claim on immigration because her mother and father probably had to face the same issues while migrating to the United States. She knows all too well the sheer desperation for a better life in a completely different country since her parents’ mother country could not provide for her future. She wants to open the readers’ eyes to an action taken in 1989 where a “reform regularized the status of… undocumented immigrants” but did not change the system on “unauthorized entries,” convincing them to support a new reform (Ngai). To capture the reader’s attention and assure them changing immigration will impact the nation positively, she answers the question over how the government is using the money to control illegal immigration and provides examples of how to reduce the numbers of unauthorized migration. Many Shorthorn readers will find her credible since she is a professor of history and Asian-American studies at Columbia. Therefore, UTA students will be able to relate to Ngai’s story and understand why she wrote this …show more content…
She claims many are waiting years just to obtain a “green card, or visas for permanent residency” because “no country may have more than 7 percent” of their applicants immigrate each year (Ngai). Another problem immigrants face is longer and tedious green card and visa application process. According to Darrell West’s article on “Inside the Immigration”, “American immigration is a 19th-century process in a 21st-century world” which means everything is done on paper and the waiting game is the most prominent aspect of this process. This conflict backs up the reason to reform immigration leading Ngai to support Hart’s reform about giving visas or green cards based on the individual or families’ need. Not just handing out visas or green cards on a first come, first serve basis, but to applicants who are in any type of danger or financial crisis. Therefore, Ngai proves her point to the readers about reforming immigration because the process takes too long with millions waiting to receive a visa or green card. Some students and their parents who have waited a decade to immigrate to the U.S. will benefit from this article while students who have never experienced this might not respond to reforming the law. Shorthorn readers

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