Analysis Of Primum Non Nocere

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Primum non nocere. First do no harm. It is the guiding principle in Western medicine that dates back to the ancient Greeks. When facing disease, medical professionals must strive “to do good or to do no harm,” as it is stated in the Hippocratic Corpus. When the line between good and harm becomes muddled in ambiguity, ethical dilemmas arise. So it goes, the case could be made for controversial procedures such as abortion and assisted suicide doing either good or harm to a human life, and the position one takes largely dependent on their religious, social, and political ideologies. Whether we agree that taking a life in these examples is justified or not, we take solace in knowing that suffering has ended for a human that wished to go through …show more content…
I am not talking about rogue, psychotic doctors who intentionally hurt their patients. I am talking about those who truly believed that their actions were helping those they treated, but in reality they were directing their patients towards death. Unfortunately, this has been the case for thousands of pain sufferers who have been prescribed prescription opioids. And it has left our country, especially our physicians, wondering how to find the cure is for this country’s ailment. This anthology aims to cover the prescription opioid epidemic from the perspective of the physician, highlighting their struggle to rectify pharmaceutical influence, government regulation, the demands of their patients, and what they believe is the best way to treat the elusive condition of chronic pain. Not a condemnation, but a collection of insights into an issue that begins and end far beyond the doctor’s …show more content…
Unlike Dr. Gounder, rural family physician Dr. Robert Wergin does not look forward to reducing the number of opioids he prescribes to his patients. Wergin worries about the overprescribing to patients that do not need the drugs, but firmly believes that a “one size fits all prescription algorithm just doesn’t fit [his patients], but [he] has to comply.” Of equal concern is the feeling of lost trust with patients, often offended by the suggestion of removing their regimen of pain pills: “Do you think I’m an addict?” is not an accusation any physician wants to face from a patient. With more regulation, these difficult patient interactions will become more common. Hoffman’s piece demonstrates that simply reducing the number of opioids does not provide a straightforward solution, and we must ask ourselves whether we are willing to let our government reduce the autonomy of our physicians because of the irresponsible prescribing practices of a select

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