Knowledge In Plato's Allegory Of Cave

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Since the dawn of time, humanity has come to question where does our knowledge stem from, what is the source of our inherit knowledge? How we come to know what we know? Has been argued and discussed in public areas or famous literal works. One of the earliest notable examples of literal works that offered an amenable answer to the millennium old question was written by Plato during the latter-end of his life, as prominent Athenian philosopher, his literally work reflected a time-period where the foundation of societal understanding and knowledge came under questioning. In his literary work The Republic which focuses primarily on politics and the process of governing a state, is a glimpse into what Plato believed to be the stem of knowledge …show more content…
In either literary work the respective writers offer a well-rounded answer to where knowledge originates from and the obstacles or boundaries that we naturally establish due to our humanity but they highlight that in-order to truly understand one’s self-knowledge, one must first understand himself. Throughout, both literally works, the writers express their focus towards the quest for knowledge and the obstacles that block our path of knowledge. In Plato’s short story “Allegory of the Cave”, human nature towards enlightenment and un- enlightenment is depicted by a dark and gloomy cave which is home to a number of imprisoned human-begins since their birth. In their pursuit to find true illumination as they scourge for knowledge from their melancholy caves and rustles chains through the echoes and shadows from beyond the wall. As Plato’s brief description of the wall “a wall,… like a screen which marionette players have in front of them, over which they show the puppets” (Plato 868) highlights the portrayal of the wall as a screen that can only show shadows or …show more content…
For instance in Plato’s allegory, the reader is given a vivid picture of the mythological dark cave and the chained people who represent those who are ignorant without knowledge and that they live in a world similar to their own without the light of knowledge. Between the obscure setting of the cave and the world of light which is a wall which represent the barrier or the contemporary world that one must cross to reach true illumination. However, the prisoners are able to see the shadows or illusions of that “true” illumination and they believe it’s true because they are too dependent on their humanly senses making them blind to the truth. In a similar fashion, Bacon stats “the den of his own, which refracts and discolors the light of nature” (Bacon 882). Which represents our own egos that are personified as our shadows walk the path to finding the true light. This point is emphasized again in Bacon’s idol of the tribe as he indicates “For it is a false assertion that the sense of man is the measure of things”. Equally, Plato continues to suggest that the rustles chains that bound us to the contemporary world are caused by our reliance on our sensory perception as he says “Severed from those sensual pleasure… like leaden weights, were attached to them at their birth… they had been released from these impediments to the very same faculty in them

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