Dispositionism In Social Psychology

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The general effects of social situations are that individuals will change either their behavior or opinion to adjust to the social situation or group they are facing. This is viewed in two ways, situationism and dispositionism. Situationism is when an individual acts or behaves a certain way because of their environment, while dispositionism is when its believed our behavior is determined internal factors. This paper describes three classical social psychology studies that provide insight into how people conform to norms set by individuals, groups, and social roles.
2. Asch’s study’s purpose was to decide if individuals are affected by the opinions and behaviors of other people. The most subjects in the experiment were actually confederates,
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The purpose of Milgram’s basic controversial experiment was see if people could commit horrible acts because an authority figure told them too. The subjects of this experiment were 40 men who were told they were a part of an experiment that was helping improve memory. These 40 men were the teachers, and they would teach the learners answers to questions. If the learns got the answer wrong the teachers were told to use a device that delivered shocks to the learners at15- volt increments and went up to 450. However the learners were not really being shocked, but instead pretended to be in pain and beg the teachers to stop. But the researchers told the teachers to keep shocking them and 65% of them obeyed and shocked the learners to the maximum voltage. (Milgram, …show more content…
In the effect of social roles, a set of behaviors that are expected from a person in a given setting or crowd (Hare, 2003), Zimbardo’s experiment demonstrated that social roles are quickly places in unknown settings by authority. The subjects that were playing prisoners caused a riot the second day of the experiment in attempt to create their own social role in a unfamiliar situation, however it was quickly overturned by the authority in the experiment. In the effect of social norms, the expectation a group gives as to what is appropriate and inappropriate behavior for its members (Deutsch&Gerard,1955; Berkowitz, 2004), Zimbardo’s experiment shows that even in a fake situation that social norms still apply in the strongest way possible and that people almost programmed to follow them. The group, consisting of the guards and prisoners, expected that the experiment run as a real prison and so the guards treated the subjects as real prisoners. In the effect of scripts, a person’s knowledge of how a event or situation is supposed to play out (Schank & Abelson, 1977), Zimbardo’s experiment demonstrated that the subjects prior knowledge of authority and how prisoners work created the overall results in which the guards controlled the situations at the prison and treated the prisoner subjects as real prisoners. Their harassment and lack of empathy shows that the subjects that played the guards were

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