Orangemen's Day Research Paper

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Marches and parades fill the air with a beautiful, melodic sound. Everyone in Northern Ireland comes together to watch in awe as the parades go by. Little do they know, they are chanting for a gory war, in which they won. These people have a reason to be so happy. These celebrations are specifically for Protestants who won at the Battle of the Boyne. This is known as the Twelfth, or Orangemen’s Day, which is celebrated on July 12th.
Orangemen’s Day is an annual celebration. Schools and businesses are closed so students and employees can take the day off. The Protestants of Ireland come together to celebrate William of Orange, the Protestant prince of the Netherlands and the King of England, and his victory over James II, the overthrown Catholic
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It made no sense for a Catholic to be the king because they also had to be the head of the Anglican church. Parliament only kept him crowned because his Anglican daughters, Mary II and Anne, would take over. Things turned around when James II had a son who would be raised Catholic. Fearful, Parliament get James II dethroned and William and Mary crowned. The Glorious Revolution was known as the bloodless overthrow of James II. James ran off to France where he made an alliance with Louis XIV. There, Louis provided James with French officers and weapons. Another one of James’ allies was Earl of Tyrconnell, the first Catholic ruler since the Reformation. Along with him came his Irish army that controlled most of the United Kingdom. Ulster was the only place in Scotland that offered successful opposition. Then, James created a mainly Catholic Parliament and revoked legislation under which Protestant settlers had obtained land. In April of 1689, the city of Londonderry did not surrender to James’ army, and they suffered a three month blockade before reassurance came. This was caused because when James was still king, the apprentice boys in Londonderry blocked off the city’s gates to refuse access to a Catholic brigade under Lord …show more content…
England, King vs. Parliament, and Catholics vs. Protestants. There was tension between Ireland and England mainly because England took Ireland’s land and the government would not let them practice Catholicism. Next, Parliament was trying to be supreme, while the king tried to be absoulute. It all ended when Parliament overthrew James II in the Glorious Revolution because he and his son were not of the same religion as the rest of the country. James II made a comeback during the Battle of the Boyne. The major religions in England brawled it out. Finally, the Protestants did not like the idea of Catholics practicing their religion in England and Ireland. They instead forced Anglicanism on the Catholics. If the people of England were not Anglican, they would be persecuted. It was against the law to publicly practice their religion. These three storylines are the buildup to the Battle of the Boyne making it a very crucial battle in Ireland and England’s

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