Omnivore's Dilemma

Great Essays
The part of this course Language and Mass Communication will be included in this written task through the form of an editorial. The book that has been studied in class, Omnivore’s Dilemma presents multiple issues that clearly affect and concern many societies, in which by using one of the many ideas it contains, it can be embodied into an editorial. Knowing that editorials discuss issues that concern a broad audience, by using the food industry along with its social, economic and cultural impacts; which are concerns that have been discussed for centuries all over the world as shown throughout this book, is possible. The audience for this particular issue interest people who live in different societies, but in this task it will primarily target …show more content…
BY: JESSICA HERNANDEZ PUBLISHED 21 NOVEMBER 2015

“A happy animal farm”, with animals frolicking on and about, doing what their instincts tell them… pigs with their cork-like tails, chickens stretching their wings with no cage to stop them. This is what many believe a farm animal’s life to be before meeting their fates. In contrast, an animal rights advocate may argue and present to the public, videos which reveal animal cruelty. These videos, that have exposed an issue that affects a person’s morality have made many change their minds about eating meat.

The definition of a “happy chicken” can’t be fully judged by consumers, for most live miles away, however, those who choose to see their “food” in the farm can be present in its last moments of life until its life is taken away before their very eyes. They will then know the process by which they often consume without thought.

In other words, if the “food” is happy, then it’s most likely sustainable in terms that the animal has lived its life as it would in the natural world. With globalization today, the environment is in danger due to chemicals used in agriculture, affecting crops worldwide… but how does this tie back to the
…show more content…
Cows bathe in their own manure waiting for trucks to feed them grains instead of grass, in which the risk of harmful microbes can develop into diseases. Not all farms treat their animals like this, but it does put the industrial agriculture in the bad light, so one may say organic is better but is it really?

Some may argue that organic farms are better, but those that only change the living quarters of the animals are no different. An example would be as seen in Pollan’s book: chickens who are allowed out of their quarters once a day or week to stretch their wings, aren’t very different from industrial farms who leave them in cages… Yet, there are some farms that allow their animals to wander about, while also making sure the animals do not affect the environment

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