Analysis Of No Dust Is Allowed In This House

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Throughout history, society has treated women as second-class citizens. They have consistently been discriminated against because of their gender; thus, resulting in a lack of rights and proper representation. However, over the last few decades, women have made great progress, in efforts to even the playing field and speak their minds. Through Green Cane and Juicy Flotsam: Short Stories by Caribbean Women, editors Carmen Esteves and Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert display a selective amount of tales written by Caribbean women, addressing a variety of contemporary issues. Due to European colonization, which began with Christopher Columbus’ Voyage of 1493, the Caribbean is now home to many different dialects. The difference in linguistics is evident …show more content…
Along with Myriam Warner-Vieyra, Spanish-speaking author Olga Nolla, also speaks of class in her writing. Olga Nolla’s short-story, “No Dust Is Allowed in This House,” focuses on an upper-class family who was all about perfection. Doña Ines, the head of the household, was extremely strict when it came to cleanliness, and she enforced those same beliefs onto her workers. One day, after Doña Ines returned from Europe with her daughters, she discovered that her husband, Don Abelardo, had a wall built without her consent. The plot is used to emphasize that upper-class individuals, unlike lower-class individuals, often overreact over small and unimportant things. Olga Nolla also speaks on the topic of gender relations, as the narrator states that “if Doña Ines was the queen of the house, it was because [Don Abelardo] allowed her to be, because he had decided it would be so” (135). By including this into her story, Olga Nolla makes a direct reference to the idea that women are only in charge because men permitted; therefore, implying that women can’t rise to power on their …show more content…
The story is formatted in a way that gives the reader the feeling that his or her own mother is speaking to them. Kincaid usage of line after line, emphasizes that the mother is actually giving her daughter a detailed list of what to do and what not to do when she grows older. The mother gives the daughter advice on everything from how to wash and iron clothes to how to spit up in the air (124). Interestingly, although the author depicts a rather good relationship between both the mother and the daughter, it appears as if Kincaid is criticizing women. Through the list of what to do and what not to do, Kincaid could possibly be implying that women have accepted this role of not only following orders, but cooking and washing for their men as if men aren’t capable of doing it

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