Analysis Of Night In Night By Elie Wiesel

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Anne Frank, a young Jew who was killed in a concentration camp, once said in her famous diary, “In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.” Like Anne Frank, Elie Wiesel, the author of the memoir Night, the first-hand account of a Holocaust survivor, also experienced the horrific events of the Holocaust. Elie Wiesel illustrates through his use of characterization that he too believes there is still hope for humanity even in the darkest of situations. Elie Wiesel included many people from the concentration camp that showed a sense of peace and hope for all humanity. One of the main guards on his block, named the Dutch Oberkappo, was one of these people. Wiesel says on page 63 “He had some seven hundred prisoners …show more content…
Moshe the Beadle represented the first glimmer of hope before the camp. After Wiesel’s father refused to let him study Kabbalah, Moshe the Beadle “Spoke to me for hours on end about the Kabbalah’s revelations and its mysteries.” (5) Unexpectedly, Moshe was deported to work at a concentration camp. When Moshe returned, only because of an injury, he tried, with no prevail, to warn the Jews about the horrific events that he saw first-hand. “I wanted to return to Sighet to describe to you my death so that you might ready yourselves while there is still time.” (7) Moshe tried to awaken the Jews of Sighet and make them aware of the things they were simply ignoring. Even with all the evidence in the world, the Jews refused to believe what was going on. Even though Moshe was their first glimmer of hope, they did not take the action that Moshe was hoping they would. Another person who offered hope to the Wiesel family before the concentration camp was Maria, the family’s maid who worked in their home. When Maria heard that Elie and his family were being evacuated, she rushed to their home and “She begged us to come with her to her village where she had prepared a safe shelter.” (20) If Maria would have been found offering the Wiesel’s a safe shelter, she would have been killed. However, this offered the Wiesel family a glimmer of hope to know that people …show more content…
One day in Auschwitz, a young man from Warsaw stole during an air raid. Unfortunately, the man was caught and was sentenced to death. Just when the chair was about to be pulled out from under the man he shouted “Long live liberty! My curse on Germany! My curse! My—“(62) Elie Wiesel states “I remember that on that evening, the soup tasted even better than ever…” (63) Wiesel does not think the soup tastes better because a fellow prisoner was killed, but because his last words were a curse on Germany. All of the Jews in that camp heard what the man said it gave them a great sense of hope. To Wiesel, this may have been the biggest sense of hope that he was offered during his whole time at Auschwitz. Another person that Wiesel came into contact with was the Doctor that did the surgery on his foot. A few days after Wiesel’s surgery, he was informed that the camp was going to be evacuated because the Russians were near the camp, close to freeing the prisoners. Because Wiesel was in the infirmary, he and his father were offered a spot to stay, and avoid the evacuated. “Where thanks to my doctor, he could enter as either a patient or a medic.” (82) Both Wiesel and his father decided to be evacuated with the rest of the prisoners. Even though they both would have been liberated days later, the simple act of the doctor allowing Wiesel and his Father to stay meant a lot to him. It offered him a

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