Analysis Of Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine

Superior Essays
Naomi Klein argues that what happened in Iraq, and is part of a broader trend globally, is in many ways the opposite of economic and human development. Explain what she means, provide examples from Iraq, and argue EITHER in support of her analysis, or against her analysis.

The argument presented by Naomi Klein in her work, “The Shock Doctrine” is that the privatization of the government in the form of disaster capitalism, as seen after the Invasion of Iraq, is counter to economic growth and human development.1 Disaster and crisis was used to swiftly implement the radical privatization that had been slowly creeping into government during the 90’s. This is mirrored dramatically by the War in Iraq and the events leading up to it. Despite being
…show more content…
After Saddam Hussein 's regime was toppled, the denationalization of the oil companies began. This was in opposition to economic development because many Iraqis depended on these jobs that were not being outsourced to companies for a fraction of the cost. An example of this is the story she tells of the man named Mahmud where a fight broke out in the factory he worked in over privatization. Once, the privatization was completed the contractors failed consistently to provide the services they promised or did so at a much higher cost. An example of this is Parsons was given $186 million to build 142 health clinics but in actuality only built 6. Furthermore, as seen in the documentary, “Iraq for Sale”,2 Halliburton was charging extreme amounts of money for low cost items such as laundry. Also, they did not provide clean drinking water for soldiers stationed there, as promised. The vagueness of the cost-plus contracts is what allowed these companies to continue to make a profit in Iraq without providing the services promised. There were also limited regulations on these contractors so the contractors scammed by subcontracting to Saudi or Kuwaiti contractors for a fraction of the cost. Many educated Iraqis lost jobs due to the contracting out of the work and the de-Baathification of Iraq. This meant that the Iraqi people were not able …show more content…
This is evidence of disaster capitalism being in opposition of human development. With little oversight of the government contractors, human rights violations were overlooked. An example of this is the Abu Ghraib prison. Torture and mistreatment of prisoners was overlooked by the contractors that ran the prison because they could not be held accountable due to loopholes in laws. Also, many Iraqis were stripped of habeas corpus to further justify the mistreatment. Furthermore, the failure to reconstruct the country led to sectarian conflict and religious fundamentalism. An example of the sectarian violence is the bombing of Shia mosques after the invasion. The lack of economic development left a vacuum to provide basic services to the people of Iraq. This was often filled by people such as Moqtada al-Sadr, which the Mahdi Army rose up from. This furthered sectarian violence and the destabilization of the country. This violence was often seen by Iraqi businessmen as the only way to prevent foreign investors from taking over Iraqi assets. The contracting out of military support did not just degrade the humanitarian conditions for Iraqis but it also U.S. soldiers. The movie “Iraq for Sale” shows how contractors were providing water that was not clean and tents that were making the soldiers sick. In addition, they refused to switch the dining hall to at 24/7 schedule

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    It was supposed to be all about policy, not about the people. It was being washed out at the beginning when Bush 's people decided they didn 't want any personal ties to the war in the media, they didn 't want any documentation connected to the war. The forbid any photographs of the coffins of fallen men and women, of fallen soldiers arriving how after being killed in action and they also never kept track of how many Iraqis had…

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    While Sunni dominance had been an historical trend in Iraq, and the Middle East in general, (Nasr, 2006) the amount of exclusivism and mistrust of the other groups that came with the new government was also new. Following the entrance of Saddam as leader of Iraq came a war with Iran, and following that, attacks on Iraqi Kurds, following that an invasion of Kuwait and subsequently a war with the U.S. as it pushed Iraq out of Kuwait. The conflict was followed by uprisings of Shiites and Kurds but these were put down by security forces. The mistreatment of the other ethnic groups and even tribes of Sunnis that threatened to gain too much influence, in Iraq led to deepening tensions between them. But despite all this the country was still quite…

    • 1188 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Conservatism Dbq Analysis

    • 1410 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In the time period between 1960 and 1989 America was being transformed socially, politically, and economically. America saw the emergence of the Civil Rights Movement, the Great Society, and the counterculture as well as the Vietnam War all of which pushed America farther to the left. America was becoming increasingly liberal and this could be attributed as the main reason to why new conservatism rose to prominence: many americans were upset and frustrated that the country had become, in their opinion, too liberal and wanted to counteract what they saw as a break from traditional American values and system of government by becoming conservative and promoting the traditional values of society and promoting smaller government. New conservatism…

    • 1410 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Shell Oil Case Study

    • 1264 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Shell oil began functioning out of Nigeria in 1937 under the name Shell D’Arcy. Upon discovering the first commercial oil field in 1956 in the Niger Delta, Shell Nigeria began exporting oil in the year of 1958 and has been doing so ever since. At one time, oil exportation was seen as a way to transition from relying solely on the agriculture industry for exportation and move into what was thought to be the booming economy of oil. The locals of the Niger Delta area have experienced little to no growth as a result of Shell Oil’s operations and additionally have experienced negative consequences brought about by the oil company. In this paper, I will argue that Shell Oil's operation in Nigeria has been and continues to be exploitative in nature…

    • 1264 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the book Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq’s Green Zone, former Washington Post Baghdad bureau chief, Rajiv Chandrasekaran, investigates the Green Zone, a sectioned off lavished city in Iraq where the United State authorities lived and worked. The book is centered on the failure of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) not achieving their goal of helping the postwar nation Iraq, due to not fixing crucial immediate needs. Chandrasekaran does a wonderful job of explaining how the CPA failed at its goal, exposed what “war on terror” really meant, and explained the nature of the American Empire. Chandrasekaran firmly believes the CPA did not achieve the goal of helping Iraq. The CPA was originally put into place by the Bush…

    • 793 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In From Beyond Outrage the author, Robert Reich is Professor of the University of California, Berkeley. He as a Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton and as an adviser to President Barack Obama. In this article is talk about in America the economy democracy are being manipulated however the average working interest was praised by the Americans for the rich and the elite. It is not enough for people to be elected president and expect them to solve the country's problems. People need to take action for regressive.…

    • 300 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In 2009 Mr. Abramsky published 'Breadline USA ' that described hunger in low-income families and the detrimental impact of the financial crisis on their nutrition and its dire consequences on health, growth and development. Since then, things have gotten worse and "Poverty in America is back with a vengeance" when compared to Michael Harrington 's chronicle of poverty in the 1960s (The Other America). Abramsky builds on his previous book with this unvarnished realistic indictment of American society. The USA is the richest country on the planet and in recorded history, yet we have millions mired in poverty. We spend billions of dollars in aid to other countries (most of which hate us and even conspire for our destruction) or on weapons to invade and destroy real or perceived enemy states, yet our (dysfunctional) government enacts cuts to social programs because of "budget constraints"!…

    • 728 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    By the end of 2011, the last remaining U.S. troops withdrew from Iraq, signaling the end of an exhausting 8-year war. 36 years before that, the last U.S. troops abandoned Vietnam, marking the end of grueling 20-year war. Despite different beginnings, the causes for both wars’ failure have remarkable similarities. The U.S.’s overconfidence in their military superiority illustrated one important reason for the failures of the Iraq and Vietnam conflict.…

    • 455 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Iraq War has had a huge amount of impact America over the last few decades. As a child of the generation growing up during this war I’ve seen pain, hate and economic turmoil. The focus of this article is the economic turmoil created by the Iraq war: In particular the impact oil has had on our country because of it. Over the years I’ve heard a lot on the news about the oil crisis and how it has effected not only gas prices but the entire world economy. Oil is used for transportation of goods and services and because of that impacts all prices everywhere to some degree.…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Saddam Hussein

    • 1222 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Iraq War was a conflict in which the United States and coalition forces destroyed the regime of Saddam Hussein to establish a democratic government and stabilize Iraq. Saddam Hussein was a powerful…

    • 1222 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Persian Gulf War

    • 483 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The U.S. couldn’t afford an Iraqi invasion in Kuwait because that would give Iraq control over majority of the oil in the Middle East. This would allow Iraq to overprice the oil which would put the U.S.’s economy down, since oil is a high demand in America. This forces the U.S. to join the war. This is another negative affect because “American military commitment in the Gulf leading to a financial burden for U.S. taxpayers--that lasts for years” (Peterson, LATimes). Many industries took a turn for the worst for example, “The airlines saw the cost of jet fuel, which had been 60 cents a gallon before the invasion, soar to $1.40 a gallon by mid-October” (Silk,…

    • 483 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Free Trade is a Free Pass to Oppose Climate Control Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything Capitalism vs The Climate argues that in order to begin to solve the issue of climate change we must abandon the free market system American democracy is based upon. Klein states, “We have not done the things that are necessary to lower emissions because those things fundamentally conflict with deregulated capitalism” (Klein 18). Here, I will be focusing on the claim made by Naomi Klein that free market fundamentalism helped overheat the planet as discussed in chapter two of her book. I will analyze the argument made by Naomi Klein and provide additional evidence that supports why fundamentalism has contributed to climate change.…

    • 2057 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Naomi Klein’s 1999 No Logo book not only explores but also challenges the impact globalized brands and companies have had on culture. Under the chapter titled “Threats and Temps” (10) she illustrates her point in the specific area of jobs and what they represent. When we enter the final part of the book, this including chapter 16, Klein describes what is known as “Culture Jamming” where advertising is now used as a tool to convey political messages against either corporations or society itself. In this essay I will develop on to the main arguments Naomi Klein raises in No Logo and furthermore expand by adding my own view on the topic at hand with personal data.…

    • 1241 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    In this paper I will discuss the Chad-Cameroon Pipeline Project, its goals and eventual failures. The aim of the Project was to build a 1,070 km underground pipeline to transport oil from three oil fields in the Southwest of Chad, through Cameroon, and ending in a floating facility in the Atlantic Ocean (“Chad-Cameroon Pipeline Project”, 2017 para 1). Although the Pipeline succeeded in being built and generating revenue, the Project did not succeed in using that revenue for poverty reduction. Unfortunately, the World Bank focused predominantly on the economic aspects of the project, while overlooking the political and the social sectors. In this paper I will begin with an overview of the project, its goals and its underlying motives.…

    • 1644 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Negatives Of War

    • 1591 Words
    • 7 Pages

    War has been in this world for a tremendous amount of time. The very first war that has been recorded took place in mesopotamia in 2700 BCE.wars have been caused by several reasons, such as economic gain. A country would want to take over another's wealth, many countries have fought for riches, food,oils, minerals, or even for the ownership of cattles and horses. Wars can also be caused by territorial gain. A country may believe that they need more land for living, agricultural plans, or different reasons.…

    • 1591 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays