Nāgārjuna

Good Essays
Emptiness can be properly seen through the understanding of Nāgārjuna’s the Perfection of Wisdom, for it proclaims that all things are truly empty. Nāgārjuna wrote the Mūlamadhyama-kakārikā, which gives the foundation to the Indian Buddhist sector of Madhyamaka in philosophical terms. His analysis in philosophy conveys his main views that all things are empty (śūnya) or devoid intrinsic nature (svabhāva). Nāgārjuna’s point in his writings is to prove that there is more to the primary Buddhist idea that “there is no separately existing, enduring self, and that the person is a conceptual construction. (Katsura and Siderits 1)” Nāgārjuna’s initiative is, therefore, to defend to defend the assertion and provide a philosophical defense to the idea of emptiness in all things. I intend to prove the emptiness of happiness and the …show more content…
Nothing isn 't real…but nothing is empty. In order to prove that some “X” exists essentially, one would need to not refer to some other “non-X.” When one finds the true identity of some “X,” then one understands the ultimate nature/reality of that thing. If this true identity of some “X” is proved to be exhaustive, and essence-less, then “X” has no ultimate nature or essence. This “X” is empty of essence, which is the true definition of emptiness.
Using Nāgārjuna’s analysis of Desire and the one who Desires, a more exact logic can be made of Happiness and the Happy Mind (Katsura and Siderits 65).

If the one who is happy existed prior to and without happiness, then desire would be dependent on that; there being the one who pursues happiness, happiness would then exist.

This first statement touches on the difference, as well as the similarity, between a state and a subject. For two things to exist and come to be at the same time, if dependent on one another, is completely ludicrous. Something that is ultimately real would come into being by itself, without and interdependence upon anything other than

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    At least in his goals and attempt. However, he knows that it fails nonetheless. To fall short of perfection or to negate identity, is to know the very 'antinomy ' that is being negated. One cannot say 'x is not yellow ' without knowing apriori, what 'yellow ' is. Or, one cannot be a-political without supposing the 'political ' in some way.…

    • 1630 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    To accomplish the superior state, we need to realize that our inner self is identical with “Brahman”. In the opposite, Buddhism declares that there is no ultimate reality behind the physical world, barely the emptiness. To get rid of the suffering, we should just pay attention to the mentality and behavior of ourselves, but not the upper-class reality. This is the advance variance after Atman and An-atman. From my point of view, “Brahman” just like a paramount authority which can awake individual’s respect and worship.…

    • 1111 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Descartes Vs Hume

    • 1474 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In Descartes view, a substance is something that does not need another creature to exist besides the power of God. Thus, Descartes has taken a dualist view of the mind and body when he declares both things as substances. The mind doesn't need the body and the body doesn't need the mind. Descartes argues that "I have a vivid and clear idea of myself as something that thinks and isn't extended, and one of body as something that is extended and does not think. So, it is certain that I am really distinct from •my body and can exist without it"(Descartes, "Meditations on first philosophy").…

    • 1474 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    If the ultimate goal is to maximize one’s well-being, then it would seem that acting unjustly would be reasonable. Contrastingly, if an action improves another’s well-being, if it is morally good, then it would be considered just. It is debatable whether or not one can commit an act of justice, and, in doing so, maximize one’s own happiness. Many would claim that just acts are solely for the sake of others and always at the expense of one’s own self-interest. However, I would argue that committing just acts can inadvertently lead to an increase in happiness for some people.…

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The faculty of desire gets humans moving and feeling in certain ways. If the faculty of desire determines the ground of the will, it is “empirical and can furnish no practical laws” (CR: 5:21). Hence, the faculty of desire would be used as a metric of strength. This could never be universal like a CI because the way humans measure pleasure varies. Since a principle of happiness is empirical, it is material.…

    • 1171 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He says, “Natural happiness is what we get when we get what we wanted, and synthetic happiness is what we make when we don 't get what we wanted. And in our society, we have a strong belief that synthetic happiness is of an inferior kind.” (Gilbert 2004). Although it is true that our society tends to look down upon synthetic happiness, I think there’s merit behind it. If a person has to force himself to be happy, then it really isn’t happiness. It’s contentedness.…

    • 1023 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This choice will be linked with quality pleasure if the subject would not chose the other pleasure given the fact that more of that option may be given. Society tends to gravitate towards pleasures that acquire a higher aptitude. Those that seek this usually do not get the full bliss from what life has to offer only because being too informed about anything, and/or everything can decrease the spontaneous aspect of what the world has to offer. This is where we coin the phrase, “Ignorance is bliss.” I completely agree with the distinctions made by Mill between the quantity of pleasures and quality of pleasures. In addition I also agree that the quality of pleasures surpasses the quantity aspect.…

    • 817 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Material practices such as renunciation garner importance simply because they have the ability to eradicate karma. Because of this regard for all life forms, karma does not account for intent. In other words, an act that harbors no malicious object is of the almost the same karmic value as one that is of harmful intent. In Theravada Buddhism, however, this is not the case. Theravada Buddhist karma is synonymous with intent, and accounts for the belief that both thoughts and actions can have motives.…

    • 1208 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Aquinas Vs Kant

    • 2053 Words
    • 9 Pages

    In order to understand Kant’s concept of metaphysics, it is important to note the differences between a priori knowledge and a posteriori knowledge. A posteriori knowledge is knowledge gained via experience, while a priori knowledge is knowledge that is gained without experience. Kant claims that metaphysics “must never be derived from experience ...(and) is therefore a priori cognition, coming from pure understanding and pure reason” (Kant, 266). In other words, Kant believes that metaphysics is comprised of nothing but a priori judgments. To further refine his claim, he outlines clear distinctions between two types of judgments: analytic judgments and synthetic judgments (Kant, 266).…

    • 2053 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    When he talks about human good, he is referring to the highest of human good. He assumes that this highest form of good has three qualities; that it’s desirable for itself, that it isn 't desirable for the purpose of another good, and that any other goods are desired for its sake. This is wrong in the case that it is possible for someone to achieve happiness by having other good things in their life. More specifically, a specific person can attain happiness through power, honor, and wealth. When these things are taken away from the individual, he isn’t happy, therefore the “other goods” help the individual reach Aristotle 's end goal of happiness.…

    • 1492 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays