Analysis Of Mise En-Scene

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Strike cannot even buy the culturally accepted entry into manhood, and the viewer sees this develop through the mise-en-scene and narrative. Strike’s nerves lead him to the bar next door, where he asks for a Chocolate Moose, only to be ridiculed by the other men. His older brother Victor is a regular, convening at the bar after long days at work. In this initial introduction to Victor, the viewer sees the stark contrast between younger and older brothers. Strike, now sipping on a piña colada, is free of responsibilities and tries to pass the ones he has onto someone else. Victor on the other hand, has many burdens; work and family duties consume his life. His refuge is solitude at the bar. Strike, knowing his brother’s loyalty, uses this moment …show more content…
Yet, Lee’s depiction of a usual crime scene shows the dissonance between the law and the community. Detectives Rocco Klein and Larry Mazili rush to the scene, but their dialogue suggests their disinterest in solving crimes such as these. Lee then inserts himself into the film as bystander Chucky, who stands in the center of the frame observing the morbid scene. Detective Rocco Klein appears behind him and asks about the situation. Without turning around, Chucky offers the information with no hesitation. But when Rocco presses for more facts, Chucky turns to the detective, startled by the face and the connotations associated with it. Now Chucky knows nothing, and “cannot speak intelligently” (Lee) about the crime. This brief scene is another recognizable sign for the audience. In the city, where crime occurs in neighborhoods every day, there is a culture of silence and ignorance that keeps the civilian safe from retaliation but frustrates the law enforcement’s efforts to solve crime. This refusal to cooperate stems from a distrust between the police and community. It is clear that Rocco Klein is one detective who cares, but even his compassion is …show more content…
Tyrone’s hair and clothing mirrors his idol’s; clad in overalls and drinking a Chocolate Moose, his now icy demeanor suggests the shedding of innocence and a cycle repeating itself. Strike forges a responsibility, assuming the role of a father, a role that is culturally only performed by a man. Yet, as Strike’s situation grows dangerous, he realizes his helplessness in protecting his protégé. In his final interaction with Tyrone, he attempts to scold him for continuously coming around. Masked in shadows as they stand in a tenement stairwell, the two go back and forth and the asserter is unclear. Finally convinced to stop bothering Strike, Tyrone ascends the stairs but not before denouncing his mentor as a “punk” (Lee). Many names are bestowed upon Strike and none of them are positive. To Tyrone’s mother, he is “death-dealing scum,” and to Detective Klein he is a “low-down, cold-blooded, junkyard nigger.” But he is also a son, brother, and nearly a casualty of his

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