Who Is Better To Reign In Hell In Paradise Lost By John Milton

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“Better to reign in Hell, than to serve in Heav’n” (Paradise Lost Line 263). This quote is from Milton’s famous epic poem, “Paradise Lost”. The zeitgeist during this time was the fear of kings disobeying the Magna Carta and starting a war with The Church of England and countries. As a religious and political dissenter, Milton is a supporter of the Commonwealth government of Oliver Cromwell (Enotes). He wrote several political tracts opposing the former monarchy. The English Civil War in England during the period of 1642-1648 and the execution of King Charles contributed to his style of violent and menacing poems (Poetry Foundation). Milton was born on December 9, 1608 in London, England into an extremely religious family. At a young age, he …show more content…
Milton is notably zealous to religion. In his poems, vehemence tones were frequently used. The English civil war impacted his poems. The war was essentially about who would have authority over the government: The Parliamentarians or the Royalist. The violent and vicious acted were traced back to religion. The common religion in England during this era was because practicing Catholicism is illegal. Christianity was tied up in politics. The Church of England and the Pope contributed to the problems. In the epic poem, “Paradise Lost”, Milton makes symbolism between the battle of Kings and The Churches to Satan and God. The poem’s idea was to justify the ways of God to men so order can be …show more content…
I researched up war poems by John Milton and Paradise Lost was the top one. It is his most famous epic poems. I am from a very religious family that 's why it caught my attention. The poem is about how the first human to be made and his partner ( Adam and Eve) disobeyed God’s order to not eat the forbidden fruit. The consequences later causes havoc in the epic poem. Milton is telling the story of the battle between God and Satan, good and evil (Sparknotes). The poem is about how God has a plan for humankind to restore order and purity back unto the world after the first

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