Support For The Working Class In Mike Rose's Blue Collar Brilliance

1392 Words 6 Pages
There are millions of jobs all over the world; some jobs require no physical labor and in some jobs, they have a lot of physical labor. The working class consists of reliable people doing whatever they can to help out the company. For instance, Karen Olsson’s Up Against Wal-Mart she talks about how she supports the working class, however, she believes that some companies, like Wal-Mart, should be a union and have better benefits. Also, in Mike Rose’s, Blue-Collar Brilliance, he explains that his mother was a waitress for a family restaurant, and while she was waitressing she found an interest in studying the customer’s behavior. Rose also mentions how his uncle started as an assembly line worker and ended up becoming the supervisor of the paint-and-body …show more content…
Rose expresses his support for the working class by writing about his mother and his uncle and the jobs they performed and how they improved in life through working. He first writes about his mother, Rosie, who is a waitress. In waitressing, the amount that they get paid all depends on how well they perform. As Rose puts it, “Her tip depended on how wells she responded to these needs, and so she became adept at reading social cues and managing feelings, both the customers’ and her own” (246). Social interactive skills are vital in any occupation, it is very important in …show more content…
Karen Olsson and Mike Rose both have full support for the working class and all that they do. The two authors write about two different situations involving the working class. Olsson writes about only one company, Wal-Mart. She discusses how the employees of Wal-Mart do not get enough rights, how their working conditions are poor, and how she wants a change on behalf of the workers. Rose writes about two of his family members who were in the working class, but Rose wrote about the working class as a whole a lot more. It was very obvious from the start that Rose was in support of the working class because of the title, Blue-Collar Brilliance. Rose mainly writes about how the working class improves employment options and how the working class improves educational opportunities. Rose writes, “Although writers and scholars have often looked at the working class, they have generally focused on the values such workers exhibit rather than on the though their work requires” (247). Both Olsson and Rose would agree that performing a working class job, the worker does not only improve what they are doing, but rather they improve other skills along the way

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