Planet Of Slums By Mike Davis

Better Essays
Mike Davis Planet Of Slums: Final In this essay I am going to explain why Mike Davis places responsibility on the treason of state, international banks, and lending institutions for the horrific conditions in what he describes as the urban south. I will also explain why there is a vast migration from the rural villages to the megacities of the third world. As well as the ideas of thinkers like Hernando de Soto and what Davis sees as his mistaken ideas. Mike Davis offers a comprehensive study of the present urban life and shows that slums have become the essential feature of the global crisis of urban overpopulation and underemployment. According to the United Nations, "More than …show more content…
They tend to follow a pattern of slow development to a sudden rapid growth and increase in population, much of which occurred during the 1950s and 60s. For the most part, many urban governments did their part to discourage or ban the urbanization of the rural poor, often with bigoted motives. For example in European Colonies like Africa natives were denied basic rights to own their own land or have permanent residence. European colonists passed laws that controlled Urbanization and also they saw African residents as temporary servants. This became an even more extreme issue when Apartheid took these pass laws to extremes, Natives were forced to leave their lands, and the British took complete control over the growth in the countryside. But British did not take into consideration that overcrowding in 'native quarters’ created a great health hazard Mike Davis also states that it, symbolized the lack of the native’s" right to the city. " (53). Another example would be Beijing which exercised extreme vigilance over rural emigration. The city and country side were divided and seen as separate worlds and only ever intersected under conditions set carefully by the state. Mike Davis writes, " If urban residents sometimes obtained official permission to move to another city, it was almost unheard of for peasants to win approval to leave their …show more content…
In South Vietnam forced urbanization was a system utilized by the U.S. military. This led to a soar in the urban population soared, "South Vietnam 's population soared from 15 percent to 65 percent, with five million displaced peasants turned into slum-dwellers or inhabitants of refugee camps."(57). In Turkey, the Marshall Plan Aid helped stimulate the migration from rural areas to cities which aided in modernization and economic growth. In the middle east the large growth of city dwellers occurred during the OPEC boom. A large number of people moved into cities looking for jobs but were left jobless and this disillusionment and anger became the spark to

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Planet Of Slums Summary

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages

    These are some of the major effects of rapid growth of the urban poors. Besides, this rapid growth makes landowners the ‘landlords’. Much of the middle class in Brazil are landlords. As stated in the statistics of the German researchers, “53 percent of the land in Southeast Asian cities was owned by the top 5 percent of landlords” and in Mumbai, “just 91 people control the majority of all vacant land” (Davis 84). As the vacant lands are disappearing, the land prices are rising higher than ever.…

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The reforms by Gaius Marius, was originally intended to give power to the Republic by upgrading Rome’s military, but it backfired causing substantial political impact which caused long term problems all leading up to the decline of the late Roman Republic. There was a major recruitment problem which came from public land being bought off by powerful groups from the senate around 180 BC to 170 BC. They used this land to produce cash crops from farm slaves. Being a part of the military was more of a privilege than anything. Only certain people could enlist and battle arms was not provided, but land rewards made people have a will to fight anyway.…

    • 1380 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For example, Awadh would rebel against the EIC because it was annexed much later than other states, which led to more economic and political resentment. During the Awadh Rebellion, peasants and artisans joined together to imprison a British garrison in Lucknow, humiliating the EIC and throwing the state into a panic (Bose and Jalal 74). The more prominent rebellions were in the former Martha Confederacy territories. Leaders such as Rani of Jhansi and Nami Sahib led peasants against the EIC in order to win independence and freedom from British dominance and rule. However, despite their best efforts, the rebellions were subsequently quashed after several years of warfare and after it became evident that the EIC couldn’t hold onto India by themselves, the British intervened and thus beginning the colonization of India by the British Empire…

    • 1034 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Chapter three of Planet of the Slums is titled “Treason of the State”. In this chapter, Davis talks about how the governments of the urban South betrayed its citizens. Governments are created with the sole purpose of caring for and protecting those who made its existence possible. At the beginning of the chapter, Davis said that the government at first, tried their best to prevent people from moving to the cities because they wanted to control the lower income of the population and maintain an agrarian economy: “Urban migration was controlled by pass laws...” (Davis 51). European colonialism was present in the British colonial cities, eastern and southern of Africa: “Until 1954, for instance, Africans were considered temporary sojourners in racially zoned Nairobi and were unable to leasehold property” (Davis 51).…

    • 1458 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Some of the misery that affected the citizens were poverty and dreadful living conditions. The cause for starting the industrial revolution were the many new inventions that came out in this era. The Second Industrial Revolution caused many people to travel from all over the world and made farmers leave their farms for a more stable income. Having all these people come to the city caused urbanization making many people come and live in the city causing people to abandon the countryside. The industrial revolution thrived on the many natural resources that were in America which increased…

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One of the fifteen statements he talked about was, “He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.” (Declaration of Independence). Due to the lack of the king following the laws, it became easier for the colonist to rebel against the crown and the parliament. Even though the colonist believed as themselves to be English gentlemen they still were not offered the same right as the English gentlemen that resided in Britain. The Englishmen who resided in Britain were taxed appropriately and had control over their own homes and did not have to abide by the Quartering Act even though the Englishmen in the colonies had to. Thomas Paine published his pamphlet, Common Sense.…

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Quartering Act Essay

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Quartering Act is the act which requires the colonial legislatures to provide weapons, foods, shelters and all other kinds of different supplies for British troops in North America in 1766 (David, The American Journey, page 122). Because of the strict taxation that English exert to America and increased resistance movement of people, the North American colonies have to enhance their military force to maintain the stability, which results in the lack of official troops at North America and the discontentment of citizens. Protest: This law was not widely accepted in all North American colonies. People from colonies cherish the land that they got from French by the war, so they were really angry about this act. (David, page 122).…

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The British caused many deaths and Indians suffered a lot from being under the British government and was hard for them to live a normal life while having British men roaming the streets. While the British want India's goods and want to make profit off of their cash crops. The British first came to India in the 1600s while the British East India Company started setting up trading posts in Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta. The British East India Company quickly took advantage of the growing weakness of the Mughals. The Company had its own army of sepoys (Indian soldiers).…

    • 1069 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    France was unable to pay off national debs, and to make up for this; the King imposed more taxes on the peasants. However, the wealthy nobles were not obligated to pay taxes. This drastically forced the two societies apart and the famine and extreme poverty gave them no choice but to revolt. Both revolutions were undertaken with the goal of independence in mind. Both revolutions spurred a strong response from the other nation.…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The French and Indian War was a main contributing factor to the American Revolution, its aftermath altered the British-American relations tremendously. After the war, Great Britain was able to “intervene” in the colonies by restricting expansion with imposing acts, levying taxes unfairly along with colonial resistance, all shaped up the British-American relationship from 1754-1776. The Proclamation of 1763 forbade colonists to settle west of the Appalachian Mountains. This restricting expansion closed off the frontier for colonial enlargement. The east coast was becoming overcrowded, and many colonists wanted to move west for a better life.…

    • 488 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays