Analysis Of Michael Pollan's An Animal Place

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Did you know that on average one person consumes 270.7 pounds of meat a year? With this startling fact one could wonder where does all this meat come from and how is it being raised? In Michael Pollan’s article “An Animal’s Place” Pollan argues the pros and cons of factory farming as well as organic farming and takes a stand for the humane treatment of animals, as well as appreciating the meat one eats. In Blake Hurst’s article titled “The Omnivore’s Delusion: Against the Agri–intellectuals” Hurst believes that industrial farming is the only way to feed the world in an abundant and cost efficient way. By reading both articles, the reader can see that no matter which side of the fence you choose to stand on there are faults in both types of …show more content…
Pollan highlights this point because he does not believe in animals having the same rights as humans but he provides a solution for the animals to have a quick death that is painless. Pollan also regards animals having the right to live their lives the way they were destined to. The author gives credit to Joel Salatins farm when he states “What this means in practice is that Salatin’s chickens live like chickens; his cows, like cows; pigs, pigs” (Pollan 407). What the author means by this is that we as consumers should be concerned with the rights animals have so they can live like that are designed to. Pollan takes it a step further in his article and explains the harshness of factory farms and the virtues of good farms. The writer states “in our factory farms and laboratories we are inflicting more suffering on more animals than at any time in history” (Pollan 399). The author believes that the factory farms have disconnected us with the life of the meat we eat; the animals are simply out of sight out of mind to the consumers in today’s world. However, Pollan seems to agree with the practices …show more content…
The authors strongly agree that there is a connection between the farmer and the animals as well as the land. Another similarity that the two authors share in their ideas is the treatment of animals is something that should be taken seriously, and the animals should be treated better. Although these two writers share a few similarities about farming and the way animals are raised, Pollan and Hurst have opposing views on how farms operate methods of farming and the effects of farming systems on the consumer. Pollan believes that animals should not be held in small cages but able to have free range to spend their lives in a natural environment. On the other hand, Hurst strongly disagrees and believes it is beneficial for an animal to be raised in captivity so it is not in danger of predators killing it. Pollan and Hurst have contrasting views on whether modern technology or “good farms” methods are what farmers should be using. Pollan believes in traditional farming where the farmer has face-to-face contact with their animals, and the methods are the same way they used to be years ago. On the contrary, Hurst feels like modern technology is the way to feed the world, this is the method that he uses as an industrial farmer. The authors also have different

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