Analysis Of Men's Athletics And Title IX

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Men’s Athletics and Title IX Title IX was passed in 1972 as part of the Education Amendments of 1972 and it protects both women and men from discrimination based on sex. The 1972 version of Title IX does not mention sports or athletics once (Goldman, 2012). In 1975, Title IX was updated to prohibit sex discrimination of athletes at educational institutions who received federal funding (Owoc, n.d.). The update required that any athlete competing in interscholastic, club, intercollegiate or intramural activity be given equal opportunity for members of both sexes (United States Education Amendments, 1972). Following the passing of the 1975 update, many institutions began to comply and offer equal opportunity to female athletes; however, some …show more content…
The primary competency I would use is the Student Learning and Development (SLD) competency. I would take the time show the male athlete how their identified male gender is a privileged identity within athletics and how Title IX was created to help address this privilege. One of the advanced outcomes of SLD is the support an inclusive and socially-just campus climate that fosters student success (ACPA & NASPA, 2010). I would let the student know that I understand they are upset and that I am here to support him, but will not allow him to keep speaking negatively about female students because I also advise female athletes. His negative comments would not be inclusive to female athletes and my Personal and Ethical Foundations (PEF) competency forces me to speak up and address the …show more content…
Female athletes still see major gaps when it comes to representation of minorities and protections under Title IX. A mindset of male athletes feeling discriminated against is growing and professionals should address this by discussing the history and necessity of Title IX. Using facts provided by the NCAA should be used to show the reasoning behind scholarship caps and help educate the student athletes further. We should not shy away from Title IX conversations but encourage them with students, staff, and

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