Analysis Of Mark Twain 's ' The Great Gatsby ' Essay

1194 Words Jan 4th, 2016 5 Pages
“When even the brightest mind in our world has been trained up from childhood in a superstition of any kind, it will never be possible for that mind, in its maturity, to examine sincerely, dispassionately, and conscientiously any evidence or any circumstance which shall seem to cast a doubt upon the validity of that superstition” (Twain 6). Mark Twain, a creative novelist, explains the idea that children need to be exposed to various beliefs and ways of thinking while they are young and in their greatest stages of learning. Great scientists such as Newton, Kepler, Galileo, and Boyle were all persistent creationists, but these scientists lived before the idea of evolution was introduced (Creations unheard argument 1). This shows that if only one idea is taught, even to some of the most intelligent people of our age, it will confine the opportunity for a different opinion. In the same manner, if only one superstition or idea is presented through the school system, this immobilizes students to grow with an open mind of understanding to a variety of ideas and beliefs, but rather it only allows for specific opinions. If public schools are aiming to teach students how to think for themselves, and learn how others beside themselves think while respecting each other’s opinions, then evolution and creationism should be taught side by side in the public school system.
Since the 1960s evolution has been taught in public schools and believed by many people (Creations unheard argument…

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