Maria Teresa And Minerva Character Analysis

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Specific Analysis: As Dedé is the only one of the four sisters still alive, she feels responsible for making sure that they are remembered correctly as opposed to being glorified. She contrasts the women they actually are to the heroines that the public sees to show that they, too, are ordinary humans with strengths, weaknesses, and morals. However, she believes that even her own nieces and nephews stereotype her sisters as heroines because of their fame, only knowing the courage and righteousness they are famous for, not their doubts and weaknesses. Dedé is the narrator of her sisters’ stories, and her narration reveals the inner worries of each sister. Through this, she shows others that the Mirabal sisters do have weaknesses, family troubles, …show more content…
Maria Teresa prefers English, because of its practicality as she is more likely to visit the U.S. than France and would need her knowledge of English for communication. Her choice reveals her down-to-earth and simple nature. On the other hand, Minerva is learning French, a beautiful language that she is not likely to have a need for, showing her tendency to reach for romantic ideals that are unrealistic. In addition, these choices also relate to the type of revolution they have in mind. Similar to the French Revolution, Minerva is passionate about freedom of the people and willing to sacrifice her life in this pursuit. Like how the French Revolution was influenced by the American Revolution, she is influenced by the Cuban Revolution and hopes to follow their example of focusing on getting rid of the totalitarian leader. Maria Teresa is less prone to violence and her motivations for joining the resistance cause are more personal. She wants to become stronger and more respected, worth of Palomino, similar to how America wanted to become independent of Britain. Maria Teresa, while she does want freedom for the people, puts herself first, unlike Minerva. In this way, Maria Teresa brings a more realistic light to Minerva’s hopeful revolution. While I agree with Maria Teresa in that it is more logical to put oneself first and live to fight another day, …show more content…
She is similar to the Virgencita in that she is deeply religious, faithful, and embodies motherly love. As for Nelson, he is similar to Jesus in that he, too, is good-hearted and willing to put himself in danger to help free his fellow countrymen. Through this comparison, Patria reveals her feelings about Nelson joining the resistance: she knows she cannot stop him even though she wants to. Patria knows that Nelson will be able to help others if he joins the resistance, exactly what she wants her children to do, but she still selfishly wishes to keep him from harm. This sort of maternal love causes her to view him as the little boy that she used to protect, regardless of how much he has grown, in the same way that the Virgencita sees Jesus as her son as opposed to a godly being. However, by letting him place himself in danger, Patria demonstrates that she places the freedom of the people and her sons’ will above her own heartbreak. I agree with her decision. After all, if most mothers kept their sons from fighting in wars, there would be a decline in the number of soldiers. Also, Nelson is no longer just a boy, but rather a man with his own ideas and wants in the world. She shows her respect for who he is now by acknowledging his decision, which is admirable. However, I do sympathize with her suffering, as one often cares about who someone is to them instead of who that person is

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