John Locke Rationalism Analysis

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The human mind has proliferated much polemic discussions questioning the origin of mankind’s knowledge. Rationalism proponents, who claim that the mind developed based on reason, rebutted the theory that the mind developed based on experiences. Other proponents, the advocators of empiricism, believed that human knowledge derived from sensory experiences. In addition, empiricist philosophers adamantly supported the tabula rasa, preaching how humans were born with a clear mind where experiences molded the mind; henceforth, in John Locke’s essay, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, he portly extols how humans should be able to freely think for themselves. With Locke’s claim of human liberty, he additionally implies how men would be able to …show more content…
In Locke’s essay, he acknowledges how God has created laws that are “visibly beneficial to all with whom the virtuous man has to do” (Locke bk.1, ch.3, par.6). However, some men praise it only because he “is sure to reap advantage to himself” (Locke 1. 3. 6). Without a concrete, tangible law, there are no restraints to how a man could go and advocate the principles to his interest because “the mind begins as ‘white paper’” (Owen 159). Also, Locke states that principles cannot be innate because “there are no practical principles wherein all men agree” (1. 3. 27). Principles cannot be universally accepted. They never agree on one set principle, which is why principles are not innate. Humanity possess different opinions. With the differing opinions, Locke shows how men take the advantage to preach the law that makes sense in the moment because of “self-interest, and the conveniences” (1. 3. 6). By revealing how humanity has contrary principles, Locke exposes man 's greed when they are able to alter …show more content…
Despite Locke edifying the purity of women, he deconstructs the importance of woman by referring to them as “female captives, whom [are] kept as concubines” (1. 3. 9). By calling women “concubines,” Locke exposes how women were regarded as mistresses and side helpers to what men wanted accomplished. Women were unable to be recalcitrant, even though Locke argues for the humans “accounts of the will and freedom” (McCall 508). Locke reveals how women were still weaker in comparison to men. In addition, Locke calls them as “female captives” (1. 3. 9), signifying how women were enslaved and expected to perform their duties that men

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