Lived Experience Practitioners

Decent Essays
In this article, Lived Experience Practitioners and the Medical Model: World’s Colliding? by Louise Byrne, Brenda Happell, and Kerry Reid-Searl, the main issue that is being discussed is the discriminations in the workforce that the Lived Experience Practitioners (LEP) have experienced from their non-lived experience colleagues and how that is stopping the LEPs from making an impact on reforming the mental health services. Promoting the recovery focus, which is more consumer-oriented, rather than strictly labeling/diagnosing and then putting the patient on medication that they might not have needed it. The problem is the unbalanced power between the LEPs and other health professionals and a critical need for the development of the LEPs within …show more content…
Thus, to only be fixated on one side of the problem and neglected all the others will hinder our ability to provide the patient with the service that they need, that is like putting on a bandage on a wound that needed more medical help and hoping that it will not get worse. Moreover, according to the author, the foundation of medical model approach is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which often than not provide the consumers with a more pharmaceutical focus, like putting them on pills. However, to define a patient with an “illness” and treat them by feeding them with different pills do not always work because the patient do not always take the pills that was prescribed to them, and for a professional to only assess them base on that then would they have to increase the level of the medications that they have prescribed their patient? Because the assumptions would then be that the medication is not working and that a stronger level is needed, never mind the fact that there is the possibility of the patient having problem with their family, community, or something else that might have prevented them from getting the medications or follow through with their

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Often time, there is a conflict of interest between the patients and the healthcare professionals resulting from drug marketing (Weber). Healthcare professional may prescribe costly medications that are not relevant in treating the patients. This may be caused by the pressure from the pharmaceutical industry to promote their drug. From this, we see that the pharmaceutical industry has a huge say in the healthcare community and is therefore impairing patient’s quality of life through unjust drug promotion and unethical drug prices. A recent controversy that came up was the price of EpiPens, a live-saving allergy medication.…

    • 806 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    If someone had to consult a professional, about ending their life due to a medical issue or something very personal, they didn’t know, it would be tough and scary for them. The patient would have to explain everything that they have gone through which wouldn’t be easy. If they had the option to could consult their doctor, it might be easier since the doctor would have been a major contender in the patient’s journey and understand what they had been through. It helps because they are a part of the full picture rather than looking in on the outside. Then there is the other side of the spectrum where if someone feels safer discussing with a mental health professional, then they have the option to talk with them.…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Healthcare professionals can come from different culture backgrounds. However, to have a successful working hospital or clinic all healthcare professionals have to work together as a single unit. Working together can become an issue when different cultures clash. The culture clash can leave people feeling that they are being discriminated against racial or ethnic identity, gender, socioeconomic status, weight or age in health care settings (Newcomb, “Stereotypes in Health Care Can Make Patients Feel Worse, Study Finds.”). If these issues of prejudice are not solved, the hospital or clinic will provide poor service to patients that need their help.…

    • 848 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    If assisted suicide became legal, patients might begin to think that their life is devalued and could be seen as another problem that society is facing. If this were to become legal, it might give off the impression that doctors don’t really care about the patient getting better. It could also possibly give off the feeling that they would rather assist them in suicide instead of having to spend tons of money on someone who could just potentially die. A solution that could be used to help fix this situation is to give more information to ill patients about the different options they have regarding their illness. A doctor named Tracy E. Miller, who is against assisted suicide, believes that patients don’t have full knowledge of the fact that they have more options besides suffering or committing suicide.…

    • 1635 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Effective Communication

    • 1387 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The American Medical Associations’ Code of Conduct categorizes disruptive behavior and agrees that patient safety and quality of care is compromised by such behaviors. The Joint Commission and other monitoring agencies has steered for better communication and drive health care leaders to discover ways to amend communication between professionals in health care. The National Patient Safety Goal of the Joint Commission accentuates proficient communication among caregivers. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices also have found that medication mistakes were associated to doctor intimidation that avoided staff from clarifying an order. Yet these attempts to diminish disruptive behavior has been ineffective mainly because of social customs and habits in the hierarchical health care setting.…

    • 1387 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “ Research has shown that competition in the health care system occur at the wrong level, over the wrong thing, in the wrong geographic market, and at the wrong time” (Harvard Business Review , 2015) Some of these issues are surrounding the poor choices from hospital employees, insurance companies. These changes should be made not in the health plans, hospital groups and health networks, but rather in treatment, prevention diagnosis along with supplying health tips on how to live a healthy life. Only at this level will they be able to really make a difference in each individual patient. This places more emphasis and focus on the patient versus the completion and cost to cure the…

    • 1629 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    What is the impact of medication errors to the patient and the health care provider? The ultimate concern with medication errors are that they seriously affect patient’s safety by causing possible deaths or adverse reactions that could cause possible repercussions. The problem for many physicians with medication errors are that due to these issues it could lead to several malpractice lawsuits and their health facilities. Discuss ways doctors make mistakes in prescribing medication. Physicians in most cases make mistakes by writing the incorrect medication names on prescriptions.…

    • 335 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Honesty in the medical profession has always been a difficult issue, particularly in the case of the doctor and patient. Often, a doctor will be tempted to withhold information from his/her patient with the belief that he/she is sparing the patient from the distress receiving such information can cause. This justification is termed “therapeutic privilege” by the American Medical Association (AMA, 2006); and many physicians, such as Dr. Collins, defend the use of such practices. However, this practice can cause more harm than good in that it prevents doctors from getting the proper consent from their patients regarding treatment options. Such consent is termed “informed consent” by the AMA and involves a doctor giving his/her patient all the…

    • 1254 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In an article titled "Should Physician Assisted Suicide Be Legal? ", the author states that "If [PAS is] legalized, the fear is that the doctors ' traditional role as healers is confused-patients will ask 'Are they here to heal me or kill me? ' says Daniel Chan." (Au), revealing that patients will become concerned about whether or not their doctor has their best interest at heart. People fear that patients will no longer trust their doctors enough to make substantial decisions for them.…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    2015). This is crucial because with miscommunication recovery is more of a challenge for patients. Deficiencies in communication exacerbate the actual disease and cripple the patient’s recovery. When a patient feels like they have no say in their medicine, they are more likely to purposely miscommunication with the doctor that their medicine is working fine in order to avoid a dispute about the what really should be done about their medicine (Stein et al. 2015).…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays