Analysis Of Laleh Khadivi's The Age Of Orphans

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The world is an amazing place with amazing people; people who sacrifice morals, rights and lives for the sake of power and prestige and greatness and renown– pursuing them as though they are their own lives running from them and they must capture them at all costs.
Laleh Khadivi 's The Age of Orphans (set in Iran) recounts the enduring story of these amazing people and those who suffer under their greatness hunt, focusing on the loss of identity and the effects of forced assimilation through the life and ventures of one fictional but legitimate Reza Pejman Khourdi. The main sufferers are the Kurds; indigenous peoples of the Middle East (primarily mountainous regions of Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria) who remain one of the world’s largest ethnic
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If a person 's individuality is demonized and/or derogated and they are taught to hate and fight it (with the threat of derision, violence and death), they will want so much to distance themselves from their dirty individualities; to belong to what they are taught to believe is the right class and they will give up everything just to do so– especially if they are young and permeable.
While waiting for God 's signal in the mountain caves of the Zagros, Reza 's father tells him:
Here this land is yours, this land is yours, here, Parthian, Sassanid, Madig and Saladin, this land is yours (Khadivi 10)...
Just as I am your father you will one day father and the land has fathered us, the lines of Kurd blood do not cross but flow together from their time to ours, through those bodies and down into the bodies of son and son and father and son and king and son and me and you. We are aligned in our duty and our duty is to those three (Khadivi 11)…
We are the children of Mount Cudi, where Noah 's ark rested after the flood, and our families are born of the animals and gardens of the survived, of God 's chosen... children born of mountain shaitans and golden angels (Khadivi
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This festering desire makes him a monster as years pass. He becomes half-machine, half-man shorn of the boy he once was, certain of his place in the world. A tribal conscript in the shah 's army at fifteen, he moves with them to a Kurdish village in search of two Kurdish rebel commanders and there they all engage in terrifying brutality to terrorize the civilians and force the rebels out of hiding. Reza partakes in the most brutal acts to prove he is one of them, even to a fellow cadet– the perfect soldier representing them and them alone. He becomes the worst of them and is duly given recognition in the army captain 's letter to the shah. In his early adulthood he still reinforces this mentality, making a palimpsest and a liar of himself although it is tearing him

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