Analysis Of Kjerkegaard's Seven Days Without A Pun Makes One Weak

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Kjerkegaard (2011:6 ) in his article "Seven Days without a Pun Makes One Weak. Two Functions of Wordplay in Literature and Literary Theory" attempts "to demonstrate that the significant differences between the various understandings of wordplay originate from its unique flexibility. This flexibility can be exploited in literary language through an interaction between a semiotic deficit and a semantic surplus. It could be claimed that wordplay is viewed in either a semiotic or a semantic perspective". He also claims that in the first perspective," wordplay will often be regarded as magical use, while in the second it will often be regarded as more critical of language, which often leads to criticism of metaphysics in general. The function …show more content…
The product can have an influence on the device, and vice versa. Therefore, it is probably not possible to discuss wordplay without involving a context and an intention". He adds that " Wordplay has been and continues to be used in several contexts, the most common of which being the criticism of language and magical language. In language criticism, wordplay is used to provoke a hesitation or delay on a semantic level and by this means to relativize the epistemological value of language; in magical language, wordplay is used to demonstrate the precedence of sense through similarities on the level of expression". He concludes that "every instance of (word) play evades an intention, even benefits greatly from the grace of chance, but this is not the case for the use of wordplay. And it is perhaps this use should be explored, rather than wordplay itself, if one could be arrived at a more comprehensible means of dealing with wordplay and puns in literary …show more content…
The general aim of his study is "to demonstrate different concepts of "optimal" translations for puns and different ideas for rendering the cultural context of the source text. In his study, he uses a descriptive method, inspired by Translation Studies, according to which the horizon of a translation is set within the target culture, and it is not intended as a prescriptive comparison of different translations according to their similarity with the original, to support the traditional prescriptive approaches to translation." The aim of this modest study is not to state what the translators should have done, but rather to describe what they have managed to

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