Analysis Of Katniss Everdeen In The Hunger Games

958 Words 4 Pages
Katniss Everdeen, the protagonist of The Hunger Games would be an example of the second. The novel became a phenomenon in the United States and sparked debate of feministic themes. Everdeen holds many ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’ characteristics. She is a nurturing care giver, and yet is lethal with a bow and arrow. After analysis of both feminism and The Hunger Games separately, it is obvious that there are overlapping sections. Everdeen can be seen as an embodiment of third-wave feminism in its flexibility of sexuality and support of female empowerment. An area of further study would be to look into the second leading character: Peeta Mellark. This male character does equally as much gender quality swapping as Everdeen. Melark is a cake decorator, …show more content…
However, although her circumstances are poor, they are not what make her character subject to debate. Instead, it is the overwhelming mixture of both ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’ characteristic that are assigned to her. Everdeen is ‘feminine’ in that she is family centered and does not have a drive to advance professionally but is nurturing and assumes the role of care-giver in multiple situations. She is modest and kills only in self-defence. Her overwhelming ‘masculine’ characteristics include that she is the protagonist drives the action within the novel. She is the head of her family and is exceptionally skilled with a bow and arrow while hunting. She is physically strong, athletic, and courageous too but has no interest in romantic endeavours. She dislikes verbalizing her emotions and struggles to connect with others and she is not motivated to refine her physical appearance beyond her trademark braided …show more content…
By taking the role as the head of her family, Everdeen asserts her domination; she assumes the typically male role of being the “bread winner.” And yet, despite her authority, Everdeen displays genuine ‘feminine’ characteristics when interacting with her family members. In the first scene of the movie, she tenderly embraces her younger sibling and provides comfort from a nightmare. Everdeen even sings to her sister in a motherly and nurturing gesture. While providing for her family is her job, Everdeen shows no interest in advancing professionally or exerting more work than is needed to keep food on the table. Everdeen is the authoritative head of the household and, yet, is family-centered. An obvious example of Everdeen’s masculinity is her knowledge and skill with a bow and arrow (though her use of said skill is in a ‘feminine’ way). “Katniss has qualities usually given to boys: a hunter who’s kept her mother and sister from starving since she was 11, she’s intrepid and tough, better at killing rabbits than expressing her feelings, a skilled bargainer in the black market for meat” (Pollitt). Despite her accuracy with a deadly weapon, she is not 10 boastful or ruthless. Within the novel, Everdeen is never the aggressor and only kills out of self-defence. These gender-mixed traits are explained by viewing “Katniss as a version of the goddess Artemis, protectress of the young and huntress

Related Documents