Political Economy: Max Weber And Engels

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Understanding political economy is an important aspect to consider when looking analyze the connection between cities and government. Political economy is the use of the combination of political science, sociology, history and economic studies in order to understand how politics can control social and economic outcomes. Some of the classical sociologists that used this methodology to observe social change were the very controversial figure Karl Marx, Max Weber and Friedrich Engels.
Although the teachings of Marx is controversial in nearly every capitalist society. Marx was a revolutionary that believed Marx realised “that the answer to the key problem of the political economy of capitalism lay in the two-sided nature of labour. The very concept
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(Lowy, 2007) Weber’s philoshpy differed in fact that he believed Marx failed to recognize the existence of status groups and that the groups could be classified based on their “consumption patterns” “status groups are normally communities, which are held together by notions of proper life-styles and by the social esteem and honor accorded to them by others”. …show more content…
According to research conducted by Political Science Quarterly some of the issues of uneven development that has occur in my area the City of Houston involve the process of waste management and its effect on minority communities. “Houston’s rapid growth and neglect of infrastructure has resulted in serious problems of hazardous waste disposal (one of the worst in the country), water and air pollution, traffic congestion, and neighborhood deterioration in public service distribution, these problems disproportionately affect minorities and poor people”

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