Analysis Of Julius Caesar's Contribution To The Republic

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In 59 BCE a three-way partnership between Julius Caesar, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, also known as Pompey, and Marcus Licinius Crassus, also known as the First Triumvirate. Together, these three men use their power and political influence to control Rome. In the end, only one man was left standing. Julius Caesar rose to power and proclaimed himself dictator. This marks the fall of the Roman Republic. Many historians such as Philip Freeman still argue whether the fall was due to Caesar, or others such as Purdue argue that it was due to economic factors as well. The purpose of this essay is to examine Julius Caesar’s contributions to the Republic, leading up to its downfall, and to assess whether he is to be held responsible. To what extent can Julius …show more content…
It was composed of Julius Caesar, Pompey and Crassus. This was known as the First Triumvirate. When Crassus was killed, the remaining two members Julius Caesar and Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus fought for control. When Pompey’s wife, Caesar’s daughter, died their relationship became even more unstable, leading to a military conflict between the two. This is known as Caesar’s Civil War. Pompey had allied himself with the Senate, versus Caesar who had the support of the people. Caesar also had the loyalty of his army, which he had fought with at Gaul. Caesar had two choices: He could bow to the Senate, but he would have been politically destroyed, or he could take the rights that the Senate had refused to grant him. The idea of civil war became a reality when Caesar and his army crossed the Rubicon. By crossing the Rubicon River, Caesar had declared war on Rome, defying the Senate. As Caesar uttered the words “Alea iacta est” or “the die is cast”, it marked the point of no return. This helped Caesar regain political influence. This civil war was the battle of the ages, between two powerful generals, each with their own army. Caesar’s military skill outmatched that of Pompey’s, having his army praise him for their success at Gaul, and for their rewards after the War. Pompey had always failed to come through on his promises to his army, lowering their respect for him. Pompey quickly decided to abandon Italy to Caesar …show more content…
Caesar portrayed himself as a descendent of Venus, and used this to imply a connection to the gods, and give himself godly power. On top of this, Caesar was a member of the Julii family, a deep patrician family dating to the foundation of the city itself. Caesar used his political and familial influence to Marius, to get himself elected, both as military tribune and Pontifex Maximus. He also controlled the votes to get elected. His influence extended so far to help him be a part of the First Triumvirate, making him one of the most powerful men. When he was sent to Gaul, his success there allowed him to secure governorship and increase his military size. The Battle of Alesia also helped Caesar’s political reputation. Caesar tactics against Vercingetorix allowed them to be victorious, and retrieve the golden eagle. He kept up moral and with impossible odds came out victorious. This contributed to his already godlike reputation. After “Caesar’s Civil War”, Caesar was in power. The Senate had already lost once to Caesar, and Caesar had the loyalty of the people. As said by Plutarch, Caesar was a very talented speaker and connected well with the common people. Caesar followed in his uncle’s footsteps supporting the people and made many political reforms that benefited the people. For example, Caesar added a law that limited the number of slaves that estates could employ. This benefited the

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