Analysis Of Jose Ortega Y Gasset's 'The Revolt Of The Masses'

900 Words 4 Pages
At the end of Great War (1914-1918), European society faced astronomical cultural and social changes that eventually led to the rise Fascism in Italy, Germany, and Spain. Throughout the 1920s, Jose Ortega y Gasset gave series of lectures that eventually became his magnum opus entitled The Revolt of the Masses. His work centers on the rise of the mass-man and his disregard for political authority (or the state), culture, and progress. Gasset essentially argues that the perfection of the 19th century gave rise to the barbarism that occurred throughout the 20th century, which allowed for the conditions that led the mass-man away from being a noble man and gave rise to his selfish nature. The mass- man serves as the perfect spokesperson for universal …show more content…
He claims that “historical knowledge” preserves and continues Western civilization into a new epoch and prevents man from “committing the ingenuous mistakes of other times.” The concept historical knowledge and ignorance constantly appears through the text, but Ortega makes the same mistake himself when he fails to mention Europe’s past history with imperialism and the spread of Eurocentrism throughout the world. Imperial endeavors, in countries like Russia and Italy, required vast amounts of revenue, soldiers, and natural resources that were required to run these nations. For example, Russia constantly expanded its presence in Iran throughout the 19th century that it weakened the Tsarist government. It was factors like this that led to rise of Bolshevism in Russia and Fascism in Italy, but Ortega y Gasset focuses more on a total history of the 19th century, rather than accurate portrayal of how things occurred. While this temporarily weakens his overall argument of historical ignorance, it also forces the reader to concentrate on the theme of the 19th verses the 20th …show more content…
Throughout the 1800s, parliamentary democracy, liberalism, and imperialism served as the driving ideologies throughout Europe, which led to many technological advancements and social cultural changes throughout the Western World. England, France, and Italy experienced an increase of revenue, while spreading their own culture and dominance in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. As a result, the mass-man did not need to work as hard for his material needs because of technological advancement, which allowed him to focus on his own materialism and forgot about the world around him. Instead, Ortega y Gasset praises the noble man and his desire to go against the gain and fight for the atrocities in society that the mass-man chooses to accept. The noble man declined because people sought to go along with the status quo in

Related Documents