Analysis Of Jonathan Kozol's Shame Of The Nation

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It would be improvable for someone who claims to care about the welfare and education of all of America’s children and not be outraged and cry out for reform after reading Jonathan Kozol’s Shame of the Nation. That being said Americans ignore the gross inequality and growing resegregation of schools between Anglo-American’s and their minority brethren.. There are even those who justify these atrocities, whether it be because of feelings of race/class superiority/inferiority or because of object apathy for the poor who some believe bring their trouble on themselves. Some would even rather plead ignorance toward the problem and if they continue it can only be assumed that things will escalate and there is nothing in this world that can justify …show more content…
Schools have long been a ground for deculturelize and indoctrination, leaning toward a white ideal, leaving those who were thought incapable of such a model by nature of their birth to grasp the basics and work as underlings for those who were (Spring, 2011). In other words the different were educated to be mindless drones for labor. This further escalated through the publication, in 1909, of a book called "Laggards in Our School 's" by Leonard Ayres that seemed to prove that African American children had by nature a significantly lower IQ than white children of the same age (Kozol, 2005). This led many to believe that these children were simply incapable of learning and should be kept away from white children so that their curriculum should not be dumbed down for the so called inept students (Kozol, 2005). This is a trend that still continues today despite the disproval of Ayre 's theory and a growing mistrust of IQ exams. Many believe that because unlike their white middle class contemporaries, most of those students in poverty or of the minority will’ by accident of birth, be doomed to menial labor, academic courses are thought as an unneeded luxury and one that would only waste taxpayer 's dollars and educator 's time. Instead many inner-city of children, most of them "children of color" are forced into vocational courses like sewing …show more content…
While separate from the above justification a great relation still exists and this still stems from a feeling of superiority, albeit moral and virtue based rather than racial or cultural in origin. These American 's believe that the poor live in the situation because they are lazy, ignorant and violent. Their schools reflect this not for lack of funding but rather because the students do not want to learn or change and even a rather large endowment to these schools could not change this, so once again, why bother? Kozol talks about cites the violence of many inner-city, mostly segregated schools as an example of citations somebody of this school of thought may give. Shootings, fight; these all to common occurrences, even if not especially in schools named after minority peace leaders like the late Martian Luther King Jr (Kozol, 2005). Also cited is the common of occurrence of 99% minority and, or poverty ridden schools, many of which are run down, located in neighborhoods with white or middle class residents in the majority which lead American who subscribe to this school of thought to believe that you can take the child out of the ghetto but you cannot take the ghetto out of the child (Kozol,

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