Religion In Paradise Lost By John Milton

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In 1600, several changes emerged in Europe, by exposing rebellious ways of thinking that permitted the emerge of modern structures in writing performance. These changes were essentially revolutionary and deliberately influenced the antecedent of the new Baroque style that could be found in the Renaissance period. During the Middle Ages, the Catholic Church accentuated on the spiritual domain that discouraged realists representation of the physical world in art. The Renaissance period experienced the rebirth of the realistic description of nature and the human figure by artists inspired by ancient Greek and Roman art and culture. Paradise Lost is a epic poem of the XVII century, written by John Milton, published in 1667. Milton built a solid …show more content…
Milton’s political ideals are expressed by the outright freedom of a person, his distrust of institutions was followed by his assumption that power truly corrupts human beings, humans become greedy and are drove by lust and desire. Milton presents the insight of his religion position, that each individual Christian should follow his own values and faith, regardless the societies attempts of corrupting one’s soul. Milton’s highly individual view of Christianity makes Paradise Lost both specific and extensive. In his later years, Milton understood that the Christian churches were an obstacle to true faith. Milton supported that any individual's conscience was a much more powerful asset in defining the Word of God than the example set by the church. Throughout Paradise Lost, Milton expresses that Adam and Eve’s fall from grace was actually fortunate, as it gives every human the opportunity to absolve themselves by true emancipation and faith and by understanding that their actions might come with consequences and can lead to horrible disasters. Nonetheless, the poem does not present a cohesive theory of the Christian doctrine, neither attempts to identify nonbelievers. Instead, Milton’s epic stand as a remarkable presentation of biblical stories that were meant to recruit Christian readers and help them become better Christians with a bigger faith in God and his subjects. By believing in God the bigger …show more content…
In these sentences, Milton manages to expose how he sees the poem’s strategy. On one hand, he calls the muse at the beginning of an epic and displays a that Milton is in fact acknowledging the awareness of Homer and Virgil and warns that he has acquired their plan and structure and wants to be part of their tradition. But since Milton identified his muse as the divine spirit that has motivated the creation of the Bible and created the world. Milton’s epic will exceed theirs by presenting a more fundamental origin of reality and dealing important issues that humans have to face and by presenting a more complex and innovating poem. On the contrary to the gods of classical epics, whose desires often reflected those of the humans, Milton's God is invisible and omnipresent, a God who cannot be considered an individual. Thus, Milton begins his poem by presenting the humble ambition promise to rise over the ancient poets for God's glorification. The approach set by Milton to the invocation of the muse, which he takes a classical literary assemblance and renews it from a Christian perspective, sets the pattern for all of the poem. For instance, by cataloging the outstanding devils in Hell and explaining the several names they were known by. The Iliad and the Aeneid are two great epic poems of Greek and Latin. Correspondingly, Milton imitates them because he expects Paradise Lost to be the first ever English epic poem.

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