Analysis Of John Locke's Theory Of Natural Freedom

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Writing in the 17th Century, Locke’s ideas about the relationship between the individual and the state have had far reaching implications, with the idea that government exists to serve its citizens rather than having a ‘Divine Right’ having progressed from being considered radical to being the dominant belief in political thinking today. Locke believed that all men were naturally in a state of “perfect freedom to order their actions and dispose of their possessions and persons….within the bounds of the law of nature” (Gough 1948, pp.4) and that whilst perfect freedom led to what he called ‘inconveniences’ it was the government’s responsibility to preserve these freedoms so far as possible. However, despite the merit of his arguments which have …show more content…
Locke claimed that “The natural liberty of man is to be free from any superior power … not to be under the will or legislative authority of men, but to have only the law of nature for his rule” (Gough 1948, pp. 13) believing governments should seek to preserve this freedom as far as possible. Locke also believed that whilst men were in a state of nature, they were free within the bounds of natural law, although several ‘inconveniences’ had lead men to agree to form a state and be bound by the will of the majority (Roberts and Sutch 2012 2nd ed, …show more content…
Indeed, Alasdair Macintyre claimed that his work was so deeply religious that it was unfit to be taught in U.S. Public Schools (Gencer 2010, pp.324). The premise of Locke’s argument for natural equality was that he claimed God did not grant Adam any special authority over his children thus meaning that Adam’s direct decedents did not have any special claim to govern (Gencer 2010, pp 327). Although this could have provided a problem, this deficiency can be overlooked as Locke’s idea of natural law is detectable through secular, rational means as demonstrated by the works of Rothbard (Rothbard 1983, pp.4) meaning that Locke’s reliance on religion can be dismissed as a product of its time (Roberts and Sutch 2012 2nd ed,

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