Analysis Of John Holland's Theory Of Vocational Personalities And Work Environments

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Register to read the introduction… These individuals interact with their surroundings by using their imagination, emotions and feelings. They are considered to be very creative people. They prefer to work in environments that will allow them the freedom to use their ideas to express themselves. These type people chose careers such as poets, musicians, writers and designers. The education level of these types of people rank second highest of the six categories. Artistic types live life on the edge of normally accepted behavior. They tend to go against the norms of society. They are also very emotional and sensitive people, which may explain why they tend to have a higher rate of personality disorders when compared to the other personality types (Lowman, 1991). They are not driven by economic rewards, but are driven to seek out the internal rewards they feel by expressing …show more content…
These individuals seek out environments that are very structured and require a high level of detail (Farmer, 1985). The Conventional person will enjoy working with numbers and people. They are generally found in clerical careers, tellers, cashiers, office managers and accountants (Chacko, 1991). These type people are the least flexible of the six categories, when it comes to their environment. They perform bests in environments that have clear direction and procedures for reaching goals. These types of people do well in governmental agencies where policies are stressed and rules leave little room for …show more content…
His theory has been widely accepted by the clinical community (Trusty, Robinson & Plata, 2000). It is also noted that Holland’s theory is said to be complex in practical vocational use, but is easy to understand theoretically. His theory states that each category has its own definite characteristics, but each type is related to the other. Holland’s theory has been researched many times sense it was introduced and even though there has been great debate over the number of personality types, there has been consistency with its outcomes (De Fruyt & Mervielde, 1999). This simply means that when a person is tested on a interest inventory instrument such as the Self Directed Search (SDS) or the Vocational Preference Inventory ( VPI) the results hold true to the theory. People tend to seek out and succeed in careers that fit their own individual personality

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