What Are The Rhetorical Devices In John F Kennedy's Inaugural Address

Superior Essays
John Adams once said “Liberty cannot be preserved without general knowledge among the people.” His words could have acted as guidance for the people in America when they were facing opposition of war and the dangerous possibility of losing the power of their freedom from foreign countries who were trying to monopolize many parts of the world. Along the same lines of Roosevelt in presidency during the World Wars or Kennedy in presidency during the threats with the Soviet Union, America seemed to be in jeopardy of losing freedom and both presidents were in office during some of the most critical moments in American history. In 1961, John F. Kennedy gave his speech during the time of conflict with the Soviet Union, and was holding the lives of …show more content…
Kennedy and Franklin Roosevelt also used different forms of rhetorical devices throughout their speech. For example, Roosevelt uses anaphora when he states, “We should bring more citizens under the coverage of old-age pensions and unemployment insurance. We should widen the opportunities for adequate medical care. We should plan a better system by which persons deserving or needing gainful employment may obtain it.” (Roosevelt para.52-54). In other words, Roosevelt uses the repetition of “we should” to help illustrate ways for the audience to understand ways that America can improve for their benefit such as protecting their freedom. By addressing the issues of the country such as the state of their security or stability, it can open the eyes of the audience to illustrate the importance of taking action to guarantee the privilege of their independence. Along the same lines, Kennedy also uses repetition when he states, “To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share… to those new states whom we welcome to the ranks of the free… to those people in the huts and villages…” (Kennedy para.7-9). In other words, Kennedy repeatedly commented “to those” to exaggerate to the extent that everyone has a part in ensuring their success and liberty. Kennedy says this to explain to his audience that rather than involving their country into the outside violence, such as wars, they can instead show kindness by helping others who are in need which can …show more content…
Kennedy and Franklin Roosevelt both had visions for the future of their country, but had contrasting ideas on how to commit with their plan. Roosevelt’s vision in order to protect America is to eradicate any threats by involving themselves into the war. He states “What I seek to convey is the historic truth that the United States as a nation has at all times maintained clear, definite opposition to any attempt to lock us in behind an ancient Chinese wall while the procession of civilization went past. Today, thinking of our children and of their children, we oppose enforced isolation for ourselves or for any other part of the Americas.” (Roosevelt para. 5). Here, Roosevelt is trying to convince Congress to approve to intercede in the war ravaging on in Europe at this time in 1941. He is using a historical example in that America has never been in approval of “locking us in” behind a metaphorical “wall” of isolation. He is also using an appeal to fear by asking Congress to think “of our children” who will pay the price for “enforced isolation” from the atrocities that are taking place in Europe. Additionally, he is saying that future generation will question why did authority did take action when people were living in a time of crisis. Contrasting to Roosevelt’s vision, Kennedy wants to completely avoid violence and war with foreign countries and instead wants to unite with the enemy and secure peace and liberty in America when he states, “...we

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