Lab-Grown Meat Analysis

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Lab-Grown Meat By Scharfenberg, David The story I’m a vegetarian Bring on the lab-grown meat written by Scharfenberg, David appeared in Boston Globe which one of the World’s most authoritative periodicals of this time. The article is all about cultured meat production. It concerns minimizing the harm that people do of their conscience to the best of the knowledge and ability and how artificial meat production will affect man and his environment. The newspaper article is indeed intended for an extensive audience every day. Hence, this analysis will hardly scratch the surface, but one can dig into the citation in the References of this paper for more detailed information. This paper is discussing the possible consequences of lab generated meat …show more content…
Grilled eggplant actually tastes quite good, especially with a little dollop of pesto. And the arguments for shunning meat are pretty unimpeachable.” (Lab-Grown Meat By Scharfenberg, David). These lines appear to be hyperbolic as well as dramatic which conveys the message that even though scientists are so enthusiastic and hardworking, the public ultimately might reach a decision in which they see the lab meat as imperfect and start to see its faults and flaws. The issue is not that the endeavor is appealing, but that it is as well with hindsight regarding the negativity of cultured meat. The author took the mythical and futuristic truth of his perception in details as depicted in the article. Though a large part of his introduction shows his disappointment on the topic that seems to be an honest view. The article talks widely about the negatives impacts that will be brought about by lab-meat. Besides, it talks about how much effort scientists have put in place or rather invested to ensure that they realize this long term goal. The researchers hope and believe that this endeavor when realized will help the lives of animals that are slaughtered to supply the meat …show more content…
In fact there are both consequential and utilitarianism forms of ethics. Regarding consequential ethics, as Ingram, and Parks assert (153), that consequences of actions matter a great deal, it tells people to choose an action that will result in greater good. However this is not the case in the context of developing lab-meat while giving considerations to the long-term practicality of the first production of artificial meat. In any case scientists are taking the view of the likes of Kant, who believes in discharging duties no matter the outcome. The author suggests that the most efficient way would be to work hand in hand with slaughter, including a limited number of donor animals that are stored as stock( Ingram, and Parks 158). However, other scientists who are in the movement predicted the creation of self-regenerating stem cells, which means that only the original biopsy is the component which would be needed, at which point there would be an indefinite replication of the cells. Of course, aspects of utilitarianism ethical issues are evident in the article. When considering man’s love of the new, diverse orexotic, they would begin breeding particular animals that are just meant for cell harvesting. However, consequently, the process would still need the confinement as well as regulation of sentient beings (Ingram, and Parks 161). As a side note, as evident in the article Post’s burger had

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