Analysis Of I Acknowledge Mine

The Panacea Ideas of Jane Goodall In her essay “I Acknowledge Mine,” Jane Goodall claims the researchers should be knowledgeable about the species they are testing, should have to observe the effects of the testing, and should have to find the balance between benefit and the cost in suffering to the animal. Miss Goodall uses relevant and significant pathos evidence including: anecdotes, loaded language, and the appeal to pity to convince her audience. The author’s purpose for the essay is to appeal to the reader’s emotions in order to convince her audience to change their perspective on the testing of chimpanzees. The intended audiences for this essay are Researchers, Scientists, Human Rights Activists, and those who have a strong will …show more content…
The author uses appeal to pity to support her claim to call upon her readers’ moral responsibility of compassion. The author tells of the video that led to the affiliation with protecting the chimpanzees and other animals. The author describes the event, “It was on, December 27, 1986, that I watched the videotaped that would change the pattern of my life. I had spent a traditional Christmas with my family in Bournemouth, England. We all sat watching the tape, and we were all shattered. Afterward, we couldn’t speak for a while. The tape showed scenes from inside a biomedical research laboratory, in which monkeys paced round and round, back and forth, within incredibly small cages stacked one on top of the other, and young chimpanzees, in similar tiny prisons, rocked back and forth or from side to side, far gone in misery and despair” (Goodall 666). The author also uses the description of her first encounter with a biomedical research laboratory to appeal to pity. The author starts her description, “Even repeated viewing of the videotape had not prepared me for the stark reality of that laboratory. I was ushered, by white-coated men who smiled nervously or glowered, into a nightmare world. The door closed behind us. Outside, everyday life went on as usual, with the sun and the trees and the birds. Inside, where no daylight had ever penetrated, it was dim and colorless. I was led along one corridor after another, and I looked into room after room lined with small, …show more content…
Researchers should observe firsthand any suffering they cause, so that they can better balance the benefit (or hoped-for benefit) to humanity against the cost in suffering to the animal”(Goodall 671). I agree with her claim, because it is rational. She realizes that animal testing does benefit humans with education, biomedical and behavioral research, and drug and product testing; all she asks is that everyone involved with animal testing should have to witness, be knowledgeable, and try to find a balance between benefit and the cost in suffering to the animal. The author uses pathos including: anecdotes, loaded language, and the appeal to pity to convince her audience. Goodall uses emotional appeal effectively in her argument, because she evokes sympathy and empathy from her audience. She changes her audience’s perspective on chimpanzee and other animal testing. These chimpanzees are not invulnerable. Jane Goodall claims that researchers should be knowledgeable about the species they are testing, should have to observe the effects of the testing, and should have to find the balance between benefit and the cost in suffering to the animal. I agree with her claim, do

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