Analysis Of Go Ask Dad For Father's Day

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Who to Ask: Dad, or the Internet? Many teenagers are awestruck with technology, and frequently turn to it before their own fathers. Simultaneously, fathers are becoming more involved in their children’s lives. Sons are referring to technology rather than their fathers, and are struggling with tasks because of this. When sons consult their fathers, they are more successful at accomplishing tasks; this also strengthens the father-son bond. Considering these circumstances, Gillette released the ad “Go Ask Dad” for Father’s Day. It [the video] presented that 94% of teenagers ask the Internet for advice before their dads. Subsequently, it showed fathers of diverse backgrounds describing their paternal experiences and how their children get …show more content…
It achieved this message by telling a heartwarming story of how teenagers who often turn to the Internet rather than their fathers learn to appreciate their dads. Gillette used pathos in their video. Fathers were seen breaking down in tears, overwhelmed with joy at their son’s approval. The fathers and sons were happy while they try to tie ties, and shave together. The director chose to show this warm, fuzzy coverage of fathers to make the viewer think of their own parent. Pathos is the appeal to emotion, and this video used it powerfully. It showed these men happy with their kids, which makes the viewer associate positive emotions with both Gillette, and their own fathers. This ad was aired around Father’s Day, when thoughts of getting gifts and calling one’s father would be …show more content…
The tasks were also relatively mundane and would be considered relatively easy if one was shown how to do it. The scenes where sons were floundering to perform tasks were humorous; they were intended to make elicit sympathy as viewers could have struggled with those tasks at some point also. This is another instance of the video using pathos to inspire the viewers. The fathers stepped in, and the sons instantly looked relieved; this was meant to show the reliance kids have on their fathers, as well as the bond they share. The fathers rectified the issues their children were facing in mere seconds because they were wise and knowledgeable. The words used included the casual term “dad” instead of “father,” and positive encouragement while the dads were teaching the sons, such as “that’s pretty good.” The facial expressions were happy throughout the latter half of the video. The color scheme was mainly dark colors, likely meant to appeal to men because it wasn’t overwhelming; also, the blue featured in the background coordinated with the Gillette logo. Gillette’s ad for Father’s Day positively represented father-son relationships. It made a successful case for sons to spend more time with their fathers. It effectively conveyed its message advocating for father-son relationships by appealing to emotion and including humor. While it could have included father-daughter relationships as well, a dual

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