Analysis Of Francis Scott Fitzgerald's The Beautiful And The Damned

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The end of World War I marked the beginning of the Jazz Age, bringing social change and economic prosperity to America. As the new culture flowered, writers sought new means of expression to convey the loss and meaningless of the new era. Francis Scott Fitzgerald was an American author who exchanged his ideas in the 1920’s through his writing as he explored and illustrated the deterioration of American society and culture. Fitzgerald’s encounters of the Jazz Age allowed him to reflect on the transformed society and its corrupted morals. His writings observed the lives of the rich upper class, while highlighting their underlying struggles and pursuit of the American Dream. Through his exploration of the Jazz Age, Fitzgerald’s writing captured …show more content…
"It was an age of miracles, it was an age of art, it was an age of excess, and it was an age of satire," noted Fitzgerald. The Beautiful and the Damned highlights the corruption that comes with excessive indulgence while revealing the sense of morality that was amsit during the Jazz Age. “I guess I am too much of a moralist at heart” Fitzgerald wrote, “and really want to preach at people in some acceptable form, rather than to entertain them.” The Beautiful and the Damned demonstrates the downside of the Jazz Age, with its illusion of unlimited money and prosperity that cloud reality. Through The Beautiful and the Damned, Fitzgerald was able to illustrate the moral deterioration caused from the excess that the Jazz Age …show more content…
The Great Gatsby epitomizes the Jazz Age, capturing the sybaritic culture of the 1920’s while highlighting the moral decay of the unrealistic American Dream. “My new novel appears in late March: The Great Gatsby,” Fitzgerald wrote in his letter to Ernest Boyd, “It represents about a year’s work and I think it’s about ten years better than anything I’ve done,” The character, Jay Gatsby, represents the idealistic self-made man in America during the 1920’s that Fitzgerald had encountered. The Jazz Age encouraged men to strive to become great and prosperous like “Gatsby,” while Fitzgerald highlighted the downfall of spiraling too deep into the American Dream. Although The Great Gatsby did not sell well, it defined the Jazz Age and contributed to American literature through its exploration of the glamorous and self-destructive

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