Analysis Of Four Women By Nina Simone

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Black womanhood continues to be as important as feminism. Black women have been treated wrong for some time now, they have been raped, beaten on, barely able to work, but still manages to be just as resilient as everyone else. Women, in general, are not being treated as an equal, but for a black woman it is even worse. Maya Angelou once said “as far as I knew white women were never lonely, except in books. White men adored them, Black men desired them and Black women worked for them.” The song “Four Women” by Nina Simone demonstrates how four black women from different times were being categorized and struggling with a sense of belonging, acceptance, and ownership. Nina Simone showed how women were treated during slavery and the after effect …show more content…
She is from the enslavement time period. She is described as being black with wooly hair and having a strong back1. Her name is Aunt Sarah, Aunt Sarah is the oldest of the four women described in the song. She has been beating on before, Nina Simone certainly emphasized on that to make sure people knew what black people went through and the suffrage, black people had to endure and show how strong a black woman really is. Aunt Sarah has to deal with ownership because she is a slave. She is treated like an animal and has been beating on again and …show more content…
Peaches is very livid because her parents were slaves, she then goes on and says she will kill the first mother she sees1. Peaches have a very hard time accepting what was done to her parents and the way they had to live their lives. She does not like the fact that they were owned. She goes on and says that her life has been rough, and she is awfully bitter these days1. Nina Simone writes this song around the time of the second wave feminism. All women are fed up: the blacks, the whites, the gays, and the straights. Women could have the same education background as a man and will still get paid less than him. Nina Simone showed how women were looked upon. Hair played a huge role in the 60s and still does today. Having knotted hair was not good, there were so many controversies on the Afro. White men tend to target black women to rape them, they did it to feel dominant or try and break the woman. Nina Simone showed the different generations of women: the slaved woman, the woman who could have been born in slavery or close to it, the woman who learned to adapt with both societies, and the woman who parents were slaves but she was not. The 60s was a year of progress and much did happen: Malcolm X was assassinated, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense started, The Voting Rights Act signed into law, and people were being sent into the Vietnam War. Nina Simone 's “Four Women” not only the showed black women’s

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