Analysis Of Fisher's Presidential War Power

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Fisher Fisher’s intentions were to demonstrate his argument that the Commander in Chief with the premise of what the framers intended with the constitution. Through out his stance, Presidential War Power, Fisher not only fights for the intentions of the framers, but also the language of which write, how Congress and the President relates to these intentions, how to United Nations plays a role in this discussion, and the idea of the decision of going to war being held to a group of people instead of one single person. All of this is related Presidential war power in the United States; however, Fisher returning to the framers intentions is a clear motive in regards to his attitude of keeping the President at arms length with checks and balances. …show more content…
Truman announced the end of the war in Europe in 1945; however, he kept troops there longer. He even went as far as to say that “a state of war still exists”. It seems that Truman wanted to keep the troops there for other agendas besides the façade that was being presented. Also President George W. Bush went forth going into Iraq with false intelligence in regards to WMD’s and yet Congress was not aggressive enough to keep W. Bush at arms length of his war power. It is clear that Fisher’s frustration in the instance is huge. This hunger for war power is vital in the premise that a single person must not obtain this kind of power and it be transported to a group of individuals for a voting …show more content…
The problem is that these emotions, regardless of any position or job, can cloud judgment and act irrationally. As Fisher mentioned, some believe that George W’s sub-plot for Iraq stemmed from getting the job done that his dad started. It is very possible that there is some truth in this and there are emotions at play here. It felt like this was a personal agenda for him to look into Hussein- “On September 26, during a campaign speech in Houston, Texas, Bush remarked, ‘this is a guy that tried to kill my dad at one time.’ The comment made some wonder whether the impulse for war reflected careful consideration of national security or was, instead, a ‘family grudge match’” (Fisher). While thinking about the kind of unprofessional rhetoric this reveals, this shows why a single person cannot have that kind of power. Yes, action was needed after the event(s) of 9/11; however, he used that incident as an excuse to dive more into the Middle East for separate

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