Analysis Of Elizabeth Larkin's Reality TV

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Register to read the introduction… She Explains how Reality TV uses humiliation as entertainment by using “Schandenfreude, a German word used to describe peoples delight and entertainment at the failings and problems of others.” Larkin also states that Reality TV isn’t as real as it is put out to be, by having set characters (Drama Queen, Muscle Head, Small Town Girl etc…) She argues that reality TV shows are as true as they seem. Larkin concludes her statement by telling us about the increased lawsuits against reality TV shows by people who have been emotionally scarred, and she wonders where the moral responsibility …show more content…
From relocating a group of people, to stage props, air time and grand prizes, Investors spend a large sum of money that could be going to a better cause. Often on these shows you will see money spent for a useless cause; “Pranked” being a example, where producers spend money to set up artificial pranks on celebrities. It doesn’t serve any beneficial purpose other than to get a small laugh out of the prank. The producers of these shows could be donating the money to help the ones less fortunate than us. They could also invest their money into a Reality TV show that helps people overcome their challenges. An example of a Reality TV show that is beneficial would be “Biggest Loser.” The producers of that show have invested their money into the sole purpose of making obese people healthier. Not only does this show help its contestants lose weight but it also helps its viewer get out and be healthier. “Biggest Looser,” kills two birds with one stone and helps move to a greater cause at the same …show more content…
In “The Case for Reality TV” Michael Hirschorn argues why Reality TV is beneficial to society. He begins by saying more people had watched American Idol, the previous week than the state of the union address on the broad cast networks combined. Hirschorn states that Reality TV is the liveliest genre on the set right now and has addressed a visceral need for a different kind of television at a time when the Web has made more traditionally produced video seem as stagey as Moliere. That Reality TV shows can leave behind the story structure and pacing of scripted television and also filter out the canned plots and characters. He also argues that Reality TV can place real people in artificial surrounding designed for maximum emotional impact, and at the same time bring the buzz back to television. He closed his argument by stating “The resistance to Reality TV ultimately comes down to snobbery, usually of the generational variety. People under 30, in my experience, tend to embrace this programming: there happy to be entertained, never mind the purity of

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