Analysis Of Elie Wiesel's Night

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Imagine a place where children killed their elders for crumbs, a place where hundreds of people were killed and abused daily. That was what happened daily at the concentration camps Elie Wiesel and his father had to suffer through. Night is a nonfiction memoir of the author, Elie Wiesel’s, terrifying experiences inside the Nazi concentration camps. In Elie Wiesel’s memoir Night, Elie metaphorically dies and is reborn as a different person after suffering through the concentration camps of the holocaust.
Before Elie suffered in the concentration camps, Elie was a religious, innocent child. While in Sighet, Elie was extremely devoted to his religion. In Elie’s memoir, he says, “I was almost 13 and deeply observant. By day I studied Talmud and
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During the concentration camps, Elie starts losing his faith in God. Throughout the terrible camps, Elie saw some terrifying things that no teen should ever see. These things caused Elie to rethink his idea about his religion, “Why, but why would I bless him? Every fiber in me rebelled. Because He caused thousands of children to burn in His mass graves? Because He kept six crematoria working day and night, including Sabbath and the Holy Days?”(Wiesel 67) This evidence shows that after seeing Jews being murdered indiscriminately, it made him rethink if there really is a God, or if he is actually as good as people say he is. Also, Elie becomes an emotionless person from the events he wants through during the Holocaust. “All day I plodded around like a sleepwalker.”(Wiesel 25) This shows that after finding out about his father being selected, he refuses to be sad and chooses to blocks out all of his emotions instead. “Our minds numb with indifference. Here or elsewhere, what did it matter?”(Wiesel 98) This shows that after suffering through so much he knows the best thing to do would be to block out everything and become an unemotional robot. As can be seen, the concentration camps caused Elie to become a faithless, emotionless …show more content…
After the Holocaust, Elie becomes more empathetic, “I witnessed a similar spectacle in Aden. Our ship’s passengers amused themselves by throwing coins to the ‘Natives,’ who dove to retrieve them. An elegant Parisian lady took great pleasure to this game. When I noticed two children desperately fighting in the water, one trying to strangle the other.”(Wiesel 100) Elie had empathy for the natives because he had first-hand experience with the same cruelty that the “natives” faced, but in his case, it was bread instead of coins. So Elie knew what would happen if it continued, and that one of them would end up hurt. So he stops the women before one of them gets seriously hurt. If Elie never went through the Holocaust and having first-hand experience with the German workers and their taunting, you can infer that nothing would have happened and Elie would have just ignored it. In addition, Elie Wiesel regains his faith and, becomes more devoted to his religion than he has ever been. “From 1972 to 1978, Wiesel was a Distinguished Professor of Judaic Studies at the City University of New York.”(https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Wiesel.html). This proves Elie Wiesel went back to devoting himself to study and learn more about his religion, Judaism. To sum up, Elie becomes a mature, faithful adult after suffering through the

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