Analysis Of Edward O. Wilson's The Diversity Of Life

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Harvard professor Edward O. Wilson, in his nonfiction book, The Diversity Of Life, narrates Wilson’s life while elaborating on the topic of biodiversity. Scientists, Flockhart et al., in their scientific journal article, “Unravelling the annual cycle in a migratory animal: breeding-season habitat loss drives population declines of monarch butterflies,” hypothesize the causes of butterfly population loss. While Wilson’s purpose is to discuss science in a narrative manner to provide reading for pleasure, Flockhart et al.’s purpose is to discuss science in an informative manner to advance scientific research. Wilson adopts an admiring tone in order to encourage complete fascination with a plethora of scientific topics. Flockhart et al. uses a …show more content…
Wilson begins the chapter “Storm Over the Amazon” by recalling an evening in the Amazon Basin, “There in a perfect bowl of the night sky, untouched by life by any human source, a thunderstorm sends its premonitory signal and begins a slow journey to the observer, who thinks: the world is about to change” (Wilson 1992). Wilson describes this setting in order to appeal to the audience’s sense of adventure. Wilson uses the phrase “untouched by life by any human source” to make the reader excited, thus appealing to their sense of adventure. Wilson also uses the word “journey” in order to make the reader think about all the different adventures they will read in the book. By using pathos, this detailed imagery creates a curious and adventurous tone that draws the reader into the …show more content…
Wilson uses a passionate tone to discuss his personal life. With the use of technical terms and narrative flair, Wilson is able to create likability and intrigue the reader. Wilson uses his intense joy for ecology in order to make the reader believe he is worth listening to. “When spotlighted the spiders froze, allowing me to approach on hands and knees and study them almost at their own level. I could distinguish a wide variety of species by size, color, and hairiness. It struck me how little is known about these creatures of the rain forest, and how deeply satisfying it would be to spend months, years, the rest of my life in this place until I knew all the species by name and every detail of their lives” (Wilson 1992). Wilson describes the scene with such specific details of his reaction to the spider such as “allowing me to approach on hands and knees and study them,” it is almost like you are living this moment through his eyes. Wilson takes pride in his understanding of species, by stating, “until I knew all the species by name and every detail of their lives,” the reader will understand his dedication to his work. Wilson discusses this experience in order to show the reader his complete fascinating of ecology therefore, appealing to

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