Analysis Of David Shambaugh's China Goes Global: The Partial Power

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When someone wants to judge the veracity of particular work of written scholarship, they must first consult reviews written by scholars working in a similar field. The exercise allows them to see how the work fits into existing scholarship, all the while providing an indirect critique of their own assumptions. It is also important to look into the author’s own credentials, as their claims should always be backed with an advanced education and a wealth of associated research. David Shambaugh’s book, China Goes Global: The Partial Power, makes several incredibly bold claims, claims that go against the grain of common assumptions about China’s growth as a global power. In order to assess the validity of these claims, one must first understand …show more content…
Shambaugh spent a lot of time in the conclusions of each of his chapters detailing the vulnerabilities of his argument in relation to time. Shambaugh stated, quite consistently in-fact, that even though China did not qualify as a global power its status could change given a sufficient pressure. But as Shambaugh said, even if China were to find that pressure within itself, the nation would require decades to adjust for effectiveness. That fact doesn’t necessarily hinder Shambaugh’s overall argument. Stuenkel does make one good point of criticism, however, and that was in his critique of Shambaugh’s representation of the United States. Though it may seem unlikely now, the United States could see a drastic shift in international policy in the near future. The resultant vacuum could, under the right circumstances, allow China to rise higher on the geo-political ladder. It does not seem as though Shambaugh spent enough time assessing that particular avenue of his research. He could have easily discussed current trends within the United States that could spell a …show more content…
He has been interviewed on several occasions by prestigious news outlets and is largely considered one of the foremost Western scholars on 21st century China. According to a review he wrote for “The Higher Times Educational Supplement,” his views on China’s growth as an international power were aligned quite well with views also held by Shambaugh. He praised the book for its content and for not assigning ontological difference to China. In his review, he wrote that Shambaugh analyzed the nation using quality research and an honest perspective. But Brown did level one fairly pointed bit of criticism against Shambaugh concerning his insistence that China does not have a singular voice among its scholarship or political elite. Brown greatly critiques this argument by stating that no nation, anywhere, possesses a homogenous perspective on global affairs. In a sense, he argues why should

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