Analysis Of Untitled PSM By Daniel Boyd

Improved Essays
The famous quote from George Santayana “Those who can not remember the past are condemned to repeat it”, underlies the cruciality and importance of preserving our historical past, due to the belief that history itself would always resonate and reoccur throughout the spectrum of time. In encouragement to the preservation of our history, Daniel Boyd’s artwork ‘Untitled PSM’ (2014) conveys the idea of how the trajectory and movement of historical knowledge that is passed back and forth becomes lost and forgotten throughout time. As a result, due to this lost of information we are conditioned with the inability to fully comprehend our past or to a larger extent, even the possibilities of the future. ‘Untitled PSM’ is a large oil and archival glue …show more content…
By exploiting and acknowledging this idea through the artwork, this strongly pressures viewers into changing their perspectives towards the significance of history. The artwork seemingly manipulates viewers to feel a sense of regret towards this loss through the dimming of the white lines, recessing into the onyx black canvas. This fading of the white into black was a simple, strong gesture in depicting the idea of how our historical knowledge is being engulfed and gradually recessed into the abyss of the forgotten. As a result to this impact, viewers are left with the encouragement to protect and preserve history in order to maintain this knowledge of the past, preventing it from being lost and forgotten forever. ‘Untitled PSM’ cleverly questions the significance of historical knowledge, as to whether such information is of crucial importance. As a result to such questionings, this probes us into remembrance of how history allows us to learn from the mistakes of the past, beneficially preventing such re occurrence in the …show more content…
The artwork influences viewers at a historical and cultural level, underlying questions of whether our historical past is of significance and importance. The work also exploits the ideology behind multiplicities of perspectives, raising concerns towards cultural lens in hopes of exploiting awareness towards the ethics of colonisation as well as the need of understanding towards different cultures. The relevance and significance of our historical past is questioned through the artwork, where Boyd cleverly establishes the idea of how historical knowledge is fading throughout time. This forces viewers to question the importance of preserving such knowledge, further reminding viewers of how history enables us to understand more of the mistakes of the past. Boyd’s ‘Untitled PSM’, tackles such controversy leaving viewers with the haunted reminisce of regret for the history that has already been forgotten and lost over time, as well as the encouragement in striving towards the preservation of historical knowledge for the

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