Analysis Of Come In By Robert Frost

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The modern period was a stage of displacement and interference, and modernist poets reacted to this instantly in a variety of ways. Robert Frost believes that Nature is never circumstantial for poetry, but is rather a vital character in his works. Throughout his poems, Robert Frost defines the existence of nature in which he talks about the struggles that is within the natural world and also use the destructive side of nature. Robert Frost is a poet who describes nature into his own unique way of how he was officious. Critics believe that most of his discussions of the lyrics have centered on these aspects. But the speaker has been rapidly integrated merely because he is colloquial and nonallusive. Most of the critics believe it was his setting …show more content…
This poem describes his insistence upon the realism and objectivity. “Come In” shows a theme of nature in which it is admiring the magnificence and minimalism of natural elements but it leads us into wisdom and meaning. The poem is about the contrast of nature as well as the general darker and lighter side of life into a further theoretical level. The fourth line of the poem “Come In” says, “Far in the pillared dark Thrush music went almost like a call to come in to the dark and lament”. Robert Frost mentions the fourth stanza as a qualification for the calling of the woods, and he also never say that there was an invitation. He said in quote is “almost like a call”. Fifth stanza of the poem says, “But no, I was out for stars; I would not come in. I meant not even if asked; and I hadn 't been.” Frost become completely realistic both rejecting the invitation and his desire to accept it. He is basically out for stars, and feels he is not permitted by him to be sidetracked and not have impulses from the unconsciousness. The last line in the poem defines the real subject for the poem in which he rejects not only the impulse but also through the fantasy as his poetic subject for the poem “Come In”. Through his body of poetry, he is describing woods as a constant adjustable through his inner self of darkness. According to Robert Frost, the original invitation that he wanted to project was the “coming of a bird” in which he impulses to descend into the darkness of the mind. But he decided instead to use “stars”. Frost mentions “stars” in other poems as symbols of all that is the outside man that never reach especially through ultimate knowledge. “Come In” is a perfect poem for Robert Frost because it states how poetic subject he uses and his poetic nature was used as well. (Wei-hisn Tien pgs. 5, and

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