Analysis Of Chief Seattle's Letter To President Pierce

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Between the decades in which the Native Americans were forced out of their land, many were in deep sorrow expressing their sentiments towards the Americans, anticipating a change. To begin, an article titled, “Letter to President Pierce, 1855”,Chief Seattle speaks upon the emotional state of the Indians. The Natives claim to feel dejected because of their loss of land, as well as their loss of cultural spirit. Chief Seattle targets the attention of the American president, Franklin Pierce, who was the 14th President of the United States. His presidential term ran from March 4, 1853 to 1857 (Franklin Pierce). President Pierce had avowed that he highly supported the unity of nations and was willing to punish anyone who was not permitting it. In …show more content…
It allows for the reader to understand that the Indians are forlorn because the Americans are being contempt towards the Indians beliefs and morals. This quote also creates an effect of imagery because it allows for the audience to picture the Indian lands being destroyed and replaced with modern American architecture, evoking a sentiment of empathy from the audience. The authors purpose was to gain authority in his proposition without disrespecting the American government. Seattle wants the Americans to see the injustice that the Natives have encountered continuously. In addition, Chief Seattle stated, “We understand that the white man does not understand our ways” (L. 1). The purpose of this quote is to show the Americans that the Indians know that they have differences in origin but they would like for them to understand one another. The Indians want to show the Americans that it is difficult for them to assimilate due the diversity of each nation. Furthermore, the author uses causal relationships to show that the taking of their lands is causing the depression of the Natives. By doing this, the author hopes to gain pity from the American government, leading to them retrieving their …show more content…
He did not care for the Indians because he was responsible for the uprise of shady treaties against the Indians for his own convenience (William Henry). In the article, Tecumseh states,”...the only way to get rid of this evil, is for the red people to unite in claiming a common and equal right in the land,” (44-48). In this fragment, Tecumseh is attempting to become allies with the Americans. He wants to persuade the president into trusting them in order to regain their territory. The author uses the rhetorical device, causal relationships in order to show the president that if they receive suitable land, they will halt all brutality. The purpose of this insertion is for Chief Tecumseh to gain control over his message to president William Henry Harrison. In addition, Tecumseh stated,”...it will be vary hard and will produce great trouble between us” (40-43). The significance of this quote is that Tecumseh is threatening the government without making it so obvious. It appears that the author is attempting to foreshadow because he is stating an event that may occur in the future if the Americans do not follow through with Tecumseh's

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