Binge Eating Disorders

1080 Words 4 Pages
Introduction For years, eating disorders have effected the self-esteems and lives of many, many people. Eating disorders impact males and females, people of all ages and ethnicities. In fact, the majority of the population will be affected by an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime. Until three years ago, there were only two eating disorders in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. After great effort and the completion of much research, the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual), has recently added binge eating disorder as its own official disorder, rather than just a symptom of bulimia nervosa, to its fifth edition. So, what has made binge eating disorder qualify as its own …show more content…
As of 2013, the newest edition of the DSM-5, binge eating disorder is officially classified as its own disorder. Confusion comes in to play for the general public, as the amendment of this disorder is changed from EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified) to binge eating disorder, which prior to 2013 was not recognized as a bona fide disorder. The gravity of this identification is significant as research has now determined that binge eating disorder is the most common eating disorder throughout the United States today with an unfortunate mortality rate of 5.2% of the American population. Tragically, there were many casualties who succumbed to binge eating disorder prior to it receiving a label. Can the addition of binge eating disorder to the DSM-5 be beneficial to our …show more content…
Some warning signs may include: the vanishing of immense amounts of food in brief periods of time, an excessive number of wrappers or trash from food, and victims secretly eating in the middle of the night or at times people don’t normally eat their regular meal, but instead indulge in secret. There is also a disruption in the average eating behaviors and dietary habits, for instance, an inconsistent yet persistent level of dieting and/or fasting, several periods of impulsive or extended feeling of being painfully full, and refusals to purge. People with this disorder deliberately create life schedules or particular rituals to free their time for times to binge without being

Related Documents